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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Image 28
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Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 28. 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1925). Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5459

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925 - Image 28, 1925, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5543/show/5459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Soviet Russia: an investigation by British women trade unionists, April to July, 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • British Women Trade Unionist Delegation
Publisher W. P. Coates
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Labor unions
  • Women
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
  • Employment
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent xxi, 88 pages, 1 leaf including frontispiece, illustrations, portraits, facsimiles folded plates; 26 cm
Original Item Location DK265.B67385
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8302907~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_4447404_027.jpg
Transcript eight hours. In the ease of small mills which have no factory school, arrangements are made for the apprentices to attend the nearest school. All apprentices have two months' holiday per year with full pay, and receive full pay all the time whilst training. After the age of eighteen years they are encouraged to continue their studies through the works club, thus affording everyone an opportunity of learning the trade throughout, both practically and technically. In our country hundreds of workers are following blind alley occupations, and never have any opportunity of learning more than one or two operations, consequently they are doomed to be classed as general labourers, or leave the trade after serving four or five years. Needless to say all the workers are highly appreciative of the system, and are doing their utmost to increase production, because to them increased production means additional benefits to the producers, more modern machinery for the trade, and more employment for the workless. Some of the mills have a special dispensary attached where the workers get free medical treatment. In one mill we found a barber's shop attached, whilst another had a co-operative society as a special feature, in addition to the workers' club and kindergarten. The Printing Trade The printing trade in Russia is hardly comparable with that in England owing to the lack of effective and up-to-date machinery, and of skilled workers. All the workers are catered for by one union, and women are encouraged to enter all branches of the trade with the exception of stereotyping, which is regarded as dangerous and unhealthy. We were informed that in a recent competition for compositors two women had secured fourth and sixth places respectively, also that on general work the women w-ere equally as quick and efficient as the men, but that on artistic work the men were easily the best. There is no difference in the rate of pay as between men and women, so that there is no fear of the women's labour being used for cutting down the standard rates. We found quite a number of women on linotype machines, whilst men were engaged feeding small machines, folding, and sewing ; quite a number of them working on the benches alongside with the women. In one works in Moscow 20 per cent, of the compositors were women. Three of the skilled binders were women, and the manager was a woman. Many new machines were being installed in this works, but we noticed that after installation some were stopped on account of the lack of skilled workers. In a newspaper office, which was a newly constructed place, special floors had been laid consisting of a wood and rubber mixture, and all the walls were painted pale grey to ease the eyestrain. Overalls were provided and washed by the firm. Hot and cold water shower baths were also provided, and every room was a model of hygiene, providing plenty of light, air, and space. Pure drinking water was provided in every department. In conversation with the workers we were told that English machines were preferred to American, but that on account of the English firms refusing to give credit, whilst Germany and America were offering long credit, orders for machinery were going to those countries. We met several printing engineers from England working in Moscow, who were greatly ( 1*)