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The foundations of Leninism
Image 45
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Stalin, Joseph, 1878-1953. The foundations of Leninism - Image 45. 1932. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5161/show/5073.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Stalin, Joseph, 1878-1953. (1932). The foundations of Leninism - Image 45. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5161/show/5073

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Stalin, Joseph, 1878-1953, The foundations of Leninism - Image 45, 1932, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/5161/show/5073.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The foundations of Leninism
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Stalin, Joseph, 1878-1953
Publisher International Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1932
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Vsesoi︠u︡znai︠a︡ kommunisticheskai︠a︡ partii︠a︡ (bolʹshevikov)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 125 pages; 18 cm
Original Item Location DK254.L4S793F71
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304488~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note Translation of O Lenine i leninizme.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 45
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_41910283_044.jpg
Transcript II THEORY 41 winning over of the peasantry to the side of the proletariat. Lenin, then, fought the adherents of "permanent" revolution not over the question of "uninterruptedness," because he himself held the point of view of uninterrupted revolution, but because they underestimated the role of the peasantry, the proletariat's greatest reserve power, and because they failed to grasp the idea of the hegemony of the proletariat. The idea of "permanent" revolution is not new. It was propounded for the first time by Marx at the end of the forties in his well-known Address to the Communist League (1850). This document is the source from which our "per- manentists" derived the idea of uninterrupted revolution. It should be noted, however, that, in taking it from Marx, our "permanentists" slightly altered it and in altering it "spoiled" it and made it unfit for practical use. The skilful hand of Lenin was needed to correct this error, to bring out Marx's idea of uninterrupted revolution in its pure form and make it a corner-stone of his theory of the revolution. This is what Marx says in regard to uninterrupted revolution in his Address. After enumerating a number of the revolutionary-democratic demands which he called upon the Communists to win, he says: "While the democratic petty bourgeois wish to bring the revolution to a conclusion as quickly as possible, and with the achievement, at most, of the above demands, it is our interest and our task to make the revolution permanent, until all more or less possessing classes have been displaced from domination, until the proletariat has conquered state power and the association of proletarians, not only in one country but in all the dominant countries of the world, has advanced so far that competition among the proletarians of these countries has ceased and that at least the decisive productive forces are concentrated in the hands of the proletarians." In other words: