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The Russian Revolution
Image 53
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Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. The Russian Revolution - Image 53. 1907?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/467.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. (1907?). The Russian Revolution - Image 53. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/467

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910, The Russian Revolution - Image 53, 1907?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/467.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910
Publisher The Free Age Press, Christchurch, Hants
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1907?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Government, Resistance to
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 88 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location JC347.R9T6
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304547~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 53
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12432827_052.jpg
Transcript THE MEANING OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. 43 At first it seems strange that men who do not know what they themselves need, can imagine that they know clearly and indubitably what the whole community needs ; and yet it is just because they do not know what they need, that they imagine they know what the whole community needs. The dissatisfaction they (lacking all guidance for their lives) dimly feel, they attribute not to themselves, but to the badness of the existing forms of social life, which differ from the one they have invented. And in cares for the rearrangement of society they find a possibility of escaping from consciousness of the wrongness of their own lives. That is why those who do not know what to do with themselves are always particularly sure what ought be done with society as a whole. The less they know about themselves, the more sure they are about society. Such men for the most part are either very thoughtless youths, or are the most depraved of social leaders, such as the Marats, Napoleons and Bismarcks; and that is why the history of the nations is full of most terrible evil- doings. The worst effect of this imaginary fore-knowledge of what society should be, and of this activity directed to the alteration of society, is that it is just this supposed knowledge and this activity which more than anything else hinders the movement of the community along the path natural to it for its true welfare. Therefore to the question, " What will the lives of the nations be like which cease to obey power ?" we reply that we not only do not know, but ought not to suppose that anyone can know. We do not know in what circumstances these nations will be placed when they cease to obey power ; but we know indubitably what each one of us must do, that those conditions of national life should be the very best. We know, without the least doubt, that in order to make those conditions the very best, we must first of all abstain from acts of violence which the existing power demands of us, as well as from those to which men fighting against the existing power to establish a new one, invite us; and we must therefore not obey any power. We must refuse to