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The Russian Revolution
Image 49
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Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. The Russian Revolution - Image 49. 1907?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. (1907?). The Russian Revolution - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/463

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910, The Russian Revolution - Image 49, 1907?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910
Publisher The Free Age Press, Christchurch, Hants
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1907?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Government, Resistance to
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 88 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location JC347.R9T6
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304547~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12432827_048.jpg
Transcript THE MEANING OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. 39 be!" I think the majority of reasonable people will prefer to clean their own clothes and boots, carry water, and trim their own lamps, than go to a factory and do obligatory labour for one hour a day to produce machines that would do all these things. When coercion is no longer used, nothing of all these fine machines that polish boots and clean plates, nor even of those that bore tunnels and impress steel, etc., will probably remain. The liberated workmen will inevitably let everything that was founded on their enslavement perish, and will inevitably begin to construct quite other machines and appliances, with other aims, of other dimensions, and very differently distributed. This is so plain and obvious, that men could not help seeing it if they were not under the influence of the superstition of civilization. It is this wide-spread and firmly-fixed superstition that causes all indications of the falseness of the path the Western nations are travelling, and all attempts to bring the erring peoples back to a free and reasonable life, to be rejected, and even to be regarded as a kind of blasphemy or madness. This blind belief that the life we have arranged for ourselves is the best possible life, also causes all the chief agents of civilization—its Government officials scientists, artists, merchants, manufacturers, and authors—while making the workers support their idle lives—to overlook their own sins and to feel perfectly sure that their activity is, not an immoral and harmful activity (as it really is), but a very useful and important one, and that they are, therefore, very important people and of great use to humanity ; and that all the stupid, trifling, and nasty things produced under their direction, such as cannons, fortresses, cinematographs, cathedrals, motors, explosive bombs, phonographs, telegraphs, and steam printing-machines that turn out mountains of paper printed with nastiness, lies and absurdities, will remain just the same when the workers are free, and will always be a great boon to humanity. Yet to people free from the superstition of civilization, it cannot but be perfectly obvious that all those conditions of life which