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The Russian Revolution
Image 16
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Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. The Russian Revolution - Image 16. 1907?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. (1907?). The Russian Revolution - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/430

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910, The Russian Revolution - Image 16, 1907?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910
Publisher The Free Age Press, Christchurch, Hants
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1907?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Government, Resistance to
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 88 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location JC347.R9T6
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304547~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12432827_015.jpg
Transcript i 7 6 THE MEANING OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. this change is that the ruled—believing in the rights of the power above them and accustomed to submit to it—as knowledge spreads and their moral consciousness becomes enlightened, begin to see and feel not only the ever increasing material harmfulness of this rule, but also that to submit to such power is becoming immoral. It was possible five hundred or a thousand years ago for people, in obedience to their rulers, to slaughter whole nations for the sake of conquest, or for dynastic or religio-fantastic aims to behead, torture, quarter, encage, destroy and enslave whole nations. But in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, subjugated people, enlightened by Christianity or by the humanitarian teachings which have grown up out of it, can no longer without pangs of conscience submit to the powers which demand that they should participate in the slaughter of men defending their freedom (as was done in the Chinese, Boer, and Philippine wars) and can no longer with quiet consciences, as formerly, know themselves to be participators in the deeds of violence and the executions which are being committed by the Governments of their countries. So that force-using power destroys itself in two ways. It destroys itself through the ever-growing depravity of those in authority, and the consequent continually-increasing burden borne by the ruled ; and through its ever-increasing deviation from the ever developing moral perception of the ruled. Therefore, where force-using power exists, a moment must inevitably come when the relation of the people towards that power must change. This moment may come sooner or later according to the degree and the rapidity of the corruption of the rulers, to the amount of their cunning, to the quieter or more restless temperament of the people, and even from their geographical position helping or hindering the intercourse of the people among themselves ; but sooner or later that moment must inevitably come to all nations. To the Western nations, which arose on the ruins of the Roman Empire, that moment came long ago. The struggle of people against Government began even in Rome; continued in all the States that succeeded Rome, and still goes on. To the Eastern i