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The Russian Revolution
Image 14
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Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. The Russian Revolution - Image 14. 1907?. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/428.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910. (1907?). The Russian Revolution - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/428

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910, The Russian Revolution - Image 14, 1907?, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/515/show/428.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Tolstoy, Leo, graf, 1828-1910
Publisher The Free Age Press, Christchurch, Hants
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London
Date 1907?
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Government, Resistance to
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 88 pages; 22 cm.
Original Item Location JC347.R9T6
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304547~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_12432827_013.jpg
Transcript T 4 THE MEANING OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. substitute for the clear and evident cause of a phenomenon one oi its effects. The cause of this or that economic condition always was (and could not but be) the oppression of some men by others. Economic conditions are a result of violence, and cannot therefore be the cause of human relations. Evil men—the Cains—who loved idleness and were covetous, always attacked good men—the Abels—the tillers of the soil, and by killing them or threatening to kill them, profited by their toil. The good, gentle, and industrious people, instead of fighting their oppressors, considered it best to submit: partly because they did not wish to fight, and partly because they could not do so without interrupting their work of feeding themselves and their neighbours. On this oppression of the good by the evil, and not on any economic conditions, all existing human societies have been, and still are, based and built. II. From the most ancient times, and among all the nations of the earth, the relations of the rulers to the ruled have been based on violence. But this relation, like everything else in the world, was and is continually changing. It changes from two causes. First because the more secure their power becomes and the longer it lasts, the more do those in power (the leisured classes who have power) grow depraved, unreasonable and cruel, and the more injurious to their subjects do their demands become. Secondly because as those in power grow more depraved, their subjects see more and more clearly the harm and folly of submitting to such depraved power. And those in power always become depraved : firstly, because such people, immoral by nature, and preferring idleness and violence to work, having grasped power and used it to satisfy their lusts and passions, give themselves up more and more to these passions and vices; and secondly,because lusts and passions,