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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 66
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 66. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4763.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 66. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4763

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 66, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4763.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 66
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_065.jpg
Transcript History is full of the unforseen. Nothing assures us that the Russian revolution will end in the society whose premises we have just described. Great changes are possible. But the Russian revolution has shown us the possibility of such a society. It has produced the embryo of a society that we must oppose. In 1917, the Russian people made their revolution. The historian has now to write how the Russian revolution has been stolen from the Russian people. But the struggle continues. The formation of the new classes gives rise to new class combats. No more than anywhere else in the world do we find in Russia a community of interests between those on the top and those on the bottom. There is a fundamental contradiction between the State apparatus, desiring to have it plans executed at an increasingly faster rate, wanting to give less to the workers, and the wage workers, who want the opposite. It is natural for this contradiction to grow sharper with the evolution of the regime. It is not surprising that thousands of revolutionists (anarchists, socialists, communists, trade-unionists and simple workers who have refused to give up their right to think for themselves) go to prison for daring to say aloud what so many say to themselves. Voices are being raised in spite of the cruel repression. These voices, still expressing their faith in the possibility of a better world, provide us with the assurance that those down below do not yield. Thousands of workers who have been reduced to bread and water burst now and then into spontaneous movements of revolt. Strikes have not disappeared. Individual terror is much more common in Russia than is known abroad. These attempts become known only when they hit such highly placed personages as Kirov. The unequalled precautions that are taken by the directors of the Soviet exploiting machine to safeguard their lives go to prove that these worthies are in constant fear of a population that appears to be thoroughly exhausted and terrorized. The class struggle continues.