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What has become of the Russian Revolution
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 58. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4755.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 58. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4755

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 58, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4755.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 58
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_057.jpg
Transcript discovered, he destroys them in cold blood and with complete un- scrupulousness. It is Stalin who draws up the list of members of the Political Bureau and the members of the Central Committee. It is Stalin who designates the all-powerful governors of the provinces and the large cities—that is, the secretaries of the Party committees. It is Stalin who names the Commissars of the People and all the high functionaries of the State, each of whom is a master in his own sphere, each of whom designates, in his turn, devoted directors in the secondary spheres. In this hierarchy, appointed and controlled from top to bottom, resides the incomparable homogeneity of the Party and the Soviet regime. Many books have been written about the man who thus holds centralized in his hands the most formidable power in history. We know of only one serious book on the subject: Stalin by Boris Souvarine, a former important member of the Hid International. This book, unequalled in any language, summarizes and clarifies an immense amount of documentation on the entire Russian Revolution. STALIN Stalin, a native of Georgia, was a student in a religious seminary. After receiving a religious education up to the age of 17, he joined the socialist movement when the first social-democratic groups were being formed in Georgia. In the course of his activity, he received several sentences and was deported to Siberia between the first and second revolution. He is one of the very few Bolshevik leaders who were never abroad. In Lenin's day, Stalin was a professional revolutionary of the second or third rank. Therefore, his accession to power, after Lenin's death, was for many entirely unexpected. At that time, all the Bolshevik tendencies struggled over power in the Party. So many illustrious names, figuring in the past struggles, were inscribed at the head of the contending groups that the victory of the obscure Stalin was like a thunder-clap. The following will explain Stalin's victory. While the various rivals were destroying one another. Stalin was biding his time. His position as the supreme Party secretary made him master of the files of the Central Committee. He knew how to use it to prepare the "very spicy dish" that Lenin foresaw. While his rivals tried to win by means of their talents as polemicists, orators or writers, Stalin contented himself with manipulating the Party file. He created positions. He placed his henchmen at strategic points. One way or another, Party functionaries became his men. As a result of favors, displacements and promotions, he won for himself the Party machinery. Stalin became the master. This termite's labor lasted years. After Lenin's death, the great Bolshevik leaders, who were to divide Lenin's succession, were Zinoviev, Trotskv. Boukharin, Kameniev, Rykov, Tomsky. To begin with, all formed a coalition against Trotsky, the strongest. Trotsky was defeated in 1924- 1925. The victors then divided themselves into two opposing camps: the 56