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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 56
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 56. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 56. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4753

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 56, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4753.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 56
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_055.jpg
Transcript Since the inconveniences that come with Party membership do not outweigh its advantages, there is a rush to get into the Party. Party membership excites the appetite and emulation of all that have the "stuff", are ambitious and are not troubled with too bothersome a conscience. To enter the Party means to serve, at the same time the existing Power, the fatherland and one's personal interests. This is how the Party is composed. Let us see now its structure. The Structure of the Party Like the official Soviet State, the Communist Party is constructed in the form of a pyramid. In every place of work there is a communist cell, with its secretary. A grade higher is the town committee, directing the activity of the cells in each locality. Above it, is the district committee, directing the activity of the committees of a number of localities. Above that is the provincial committee, then the republic committee. Still higher we find the Central Committee, and finally the Political Bureau. These are the organisms that exercise the real State power under the cover of the corresponding soviet organs. The entire system is hierarchic. An official is "proposed". That is he is named by the superior organs. At every stop of the pyramid, the secretary, the essential element of each committee, is chosen and "proposed" by the immediate higher organ. Let us examine the role of each of these ranks. The Party Member The member of the cell is first of all a diffuser of opinion, an overseer of public activity and opinion. There is a card for him in the office of his cell. He himself is subjected to surveillance by a superior. The Cell and Its Secretary The cell has its bureau. It meets at least twice a month. It has its obligatory political courses, its informational meetings, which are private or public, depending on Party requirements. At the factory, we have seen, the real power is exercised by what is called the "triangle", composed of the factory director, the president of the trade-union committee and the secretary of the communist cell. The three are generally members of the Party. The cell secretary is the real power. He is the person whom everybody fears and respects. The trade-union heads show him the deference usually accorded to an all-powerful superior. The Committee and Its Secretary Above the Party cell, we find in each city, in each district, in each province, in each Republic a corresponding Party committee. The job of each committee is to transmit the orders of the Party center, adapting them to its geographic sphere and controlling and supervising the cell secretaries, through whom the work of the cells is directed. The secretary of the Party committee controls the political life in his sphere, as well as the activity of the trusts, industries and commerce in his region. He does that through the intermediary of the directorates of these establishments. No administrator of an enterprise or a trade-union will 54