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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 55
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 55. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4752.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 55. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4752

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 55, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4752.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 55
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_054.jpg
Transcript enough and a "revolutionary temperament" is of little avail. You must, first of all, know your catechism and give clear proof that you will be docile in the future. Once in the Party, you have your foot in the stirrup. It is impossible to make your way outside of the Party, or at least without its approval. This is as true for the worker in the shop as for the engineer in his office and the actor in his theater. You first begin walking toward the sun when you enter the Party. The Party card, or at least membership in the youth organization, is the decisive trump-card that you must hold to enter all higher schools. Factory directors and all members of the administration are Party members. Nearly 72% of the colonels of the red army, 90% of generals of divisions, 100% of the generals of army corps belong to the Party; 75 to 80% of the professors and students of the principal universities are Party or Comsomol members. Party membership is therefore the only road leading to good positions, fat salaries and honors. There are many good positions to be filled in a country where the old ruling class has disappeared. Ambition has a lot of room where the newness of the political and economic regime renders experience less important than usual. Everybody is then said to have a "marshal's baton in his knapsack". But the Party does not offer all these advantages without certain conditions. First of all it exacts in exchange from its members blind, absolute submission to the order of its higher organs. It insists that the member act in accordance with the discipline of the Party at every moment of his life. It insists that he live always in accordance with the formula: "On every occasion, first a member of the Party!" The Party member must know how to use, in the least important conversation, the phrases found in the catechism of the moment. He must cultivate his gifts as an organizer, as a "leader", as an orator, so as to be able to contribute in the maximum degree to "put across" the latest Party slogan, Party policy, the latest Party maneuvres. A convenient moral code, similar to that imposed by Loyola on his soldiers, silences in the Party members every hesitation, every scruple, every remorse when there is a Party order to be executed. The Party member must have complete confidence in the higher organs of the Party. Constant spying on those about him is a virtue. The Party member must also be careful about his own behavior in public. Anything that may take on the appearance of a scandal in the eyes of the world he must carefully cover up. Once an individual has entered this organization, it is no longer possible for him to leave it of his own accord. He must stay inside if he does not want to lose all the big and small advantages he has gotten as a result of his Party membership. To leave the Party means to expose himself to the danger of being considered for always an enemy of the regime. The man who committed such a foolishness would be in the position of an unfrocked cleric. It is preferable to be put out of the Party for a moral slip or for an infringement of the common law than for a political transgression. 53