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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 54
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 54. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4751.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 54. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4751

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 54, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4751.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 54
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_053.jpg
Transcript fr" II The Real Power The study of the Rights of Man and of our Constitution tells us little about the real makeup of our society. To understand what hides behind the red flag of the USSR, we must make before the fictitious power of the Russian Soviets the same effort at critical thought that we exert before the false front of the traditional bourgeois republic. The Party The essential political organization of the USSR is the Communist Party, usually referred to simply as "the Party". The Party includes 1,500.000 to 2,000,000 active members. Besides, there is the "waiting list" of 500 to 800 thousand aspiring members. This for a population of 168 million. There are few^hj revolutionaries, old Bolsheviks from the period of revolutionary struggle, left in the Farty. They play in it the role of honorary rpprn^'pra proy^^ with sinecures. Since 1924, it is the,young who compose the enormous majority of the Party membership. They are disciplined soldiers obeying without a murmur. The great majority of the Party is composed of workers or former workers. But all the chiefs, today as formerly, are intellectuals. Whether by chance or for other reasons, the party is the reduced image of the entire Soviet society. On one side, you have the "initiates", the leaders, the directors, the possessors of Reasons, Science and Power. On the other side are the troops, subjected to a strict discipline. <^-*m—m» To enter the Party, the candidate must undergo a probationary stage and have some sponsors. For a worker; the probationary stage is 6 months, and he must have 2 sponsors with more than a year's membership. A soldier needs 6 months' probation, but he requires 2 sponsors with 2 years' membership. The peasant and artisan need one year's probation and 3 sponsors with 2 years' membership. Clerks and intellectuals need two years' probation and 5 sponsors with 5 years' membership. The young intellectual—the. careerist who wants to get to the top quickly (and for that, party membership is indispensable)—hires himself out as a worker in order to enter the Party sooner and to profit, through his entire career, by the advantages accruing to an origin that has remained privileged, for demagogic reasons as well as out of sheer inertia. At the opening of the periodic recruiting campaign (for which the candidates have, of course, been preparing all the time by canvassing for recommendations and seeking all possible aid to enter the Party), the center decides in advance, depending on the policy of the moment, what percentage of new members will be recruited from the various sections of the population. It is decided, for example, to permit the inclusion of 75% new members of worker origin, 10% of peasant origin, 30% women, 70% men, etc. Each candidates then undergoes a political examination in the local communist cell, and the district committee decides whether of not the applicant should be admitted. To be admitted, good intentions are not 52