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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 53
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 53. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4750.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 53. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4750

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 53, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4750.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 53
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_052.jpg
Transcript The Central Executive Committee, named by the general Congress of Soviets and said to represent the central executive power of the USSR, is composed of about 600 members. It meets once a year or so, for a few days, to perform the formality of approving acts that were accomplished long ago by the higher authority. The latter, named by the Central Executive Committee, is made up of a praesidium of 30 members and the various commissars of the people, who exercise legislative and executive power between sessions of the Central Committee, that is, practically all the time. The "New Constitution", "adopted" on the 5th of December, 1936, does not suggest a basic change in government. It merely consecrates the Soviets as municipal councils (which they always were), replaces the Central Executive Committee with a "Supreme Council of the Union" and the praesidium of the Central Executive Committee with a praesidium of the Supreme Council. These are new names for the old fakes. They will not give the country one shred of real liberty. The Bureaucracy The mentioned highest authority exercises its power by means of a bureaucracy appointed administratively by the directors of the commissariats and the praesidiums. This bureaucracy does not depend in the slightest degree on the supposed electors. In other words, the entire scaffolding of delegates to the different Soviets has not a bit of power. There is nothing of the original Soviets about them; for the principle of the Soviets of 1917 was that all power should come from below, that State power should be exercised by the base. In the present Russian system, the higher organs of government exercise absolute power. Everything is decided on and accomplished in the offices of the various commissariats. Not a law, not a decree, not a decision, springs from the workers at the social base. Not a law, not a decree, not a decision is proposed by the Central Executive Committee or the Congress of Soviets. In practice, no law, no decree, no decision has even the need of being approved by the Central Executive Committee of the Congress of Soviets. Every decree, every decision of a permanent organ of the government is immediately applicable and is immediately applied. One, two or three years later, these acts will receive, in a lump, the automatic approval of the approving machines that we described above. Absolutism is total here. A so-called People's Commissar is a minister possessing unlimited power in his department. He has no opposition to contend with. No organization, no Parliament, no instrument of public opinion, not even any purely verbal criticism, can gainsay his acts. True, the supreme Leader of the Communist Party can organize the villification of a commissar—when he wants to destroy him, or when he wants to burden him with the responsibility for his own mistakes. Otherwise, no minister, no great executive power in any country has a power equal to that of a Soviet People's Commissar as long as he remains in accord with the power which behind the false facade of the Soviet constitution (old or new) is the veritable master. We shall now examine the real Soviet State. 51