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What has become of the Russian Revolution
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 52. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4749.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 52. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4749

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 52, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4749.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 52
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_051.jpg
Transcript The electoral campaign was carried on exclusively by the government. In the entire USSR the same speech wa sdelivered. This speech dealt with the following topics: praise to Stalin, the "success of socialism" in Russia, the need to struggle against "counter-revolutionary" tendencies. Then, in the villages, the factories, the offices, the citizens voted for "deputies to the Soviets". The single list of candidates had already been prepared by the party officials; the Bolshevik party alone could present candidates. That is the only time when the electors manifested—not their power— but their political existence. They voted by raising hands, at meetings held in their places of work. Sometimes the small officials in charge permitted themselves to ask: "All those against raise hands!" They then recorded a unanimous vote for. The people had voted. Bands of music waited at the doors. The people were led, in good marching order, into the streets. The sole function of the deputies that were "elected" in this manner was to "elect" in their turn, in the same manner, by raising hands, a list of candidates prepared for them by the higher party organs. They thus "elected" members of the executive committee of their local Soviet as well as deputies to the district Soviets. Following the same procedure, the latter chose the immediately superior executive committee as well as the deputies to the provincial congress of Soviets. This was continued in a pyramidal fashion up to the election of the Congress of Soviets of the USSR, said to be the supreme organ of power in the country. According to the last but one constitution, this congress was supposed to meet every two years. In fact, more than four years passed before the last one met. Following the usual rigmarole, the supreme congress "elected" the Central Executive Committee. The legislative role of all these deputies—local, regional and pan- soviet—ends once they have raised their hands in unanimous assent. They have, however, another ritual gesture to perform. Periodically the Soviet deputies meet to approve the acts of their executive committees. These acts have long ago been executed. That is called "control". The deputies have a third function. This is a serious task. The Soviet deputies must always act as the defenders of the policy of the State. A deputy must carry on continuous propaganda in favor of all the acts of the government. To remain a deputy, he must prove himself a proficient propagandist. If he is not assiduous enough in the performance of his assignment, he loses his title of deputy. And that is something that an ambitious citizen does not care to do; for the rank of deputy is the first step upward in the Soviet hierarchy. A man who is clever enough to prove beyond doubt that he can obey blindly will climb high. In theory the Soviets and their congresses constitute the legislative arm of the State power. And in theory, the executive power is exercised by the executive committees chosen at the various Soviet congresses. These executive committees have a broader power, or rather a broader field of activity, than the Soviets. But it is understood that this activity never reaches beyond the tasks assigned to the executive committees by the real government. Each committee member is given a special function, a concrete task, to accomplish. 50