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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 51
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 51. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4748.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 51. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4748

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 51, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4748.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 51
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_050.jpg
Transcript "brains" of the Plan, who live on the worker's labor, think for him all the time, in all situations. The disappearance of what we usually recognize as capitalism does not, therefore, necessarily bring emancipation to the worker. The Russian example shows the possibility of a regime that we did not foresee: the rule of the economic and social "technician" succeeding the rule of the traditional capitalist. Part Three THE STATE AND CLASSES As elsewhere, the State in Russia pretends to be what it is not. All governments find it convenient to inscribe on public monuments, prisons, banks and lodging houses fine formulae like "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity." Such good intentions are condensed in constitutional texts to form the false front of State power. They are the insignia of the official or fictitious power. In the traditional capitalist society, such official, political simulacra disguise the real power of the large financial and industrial corporations. Similarly in the USSR the advertised demagogic devises of the Soviets are used to hide a totally different apparatus, which is the real holder of State power. But "State power" connotes the existence of classes. Are there classes in contemporary Russia? We shall examine, in this part, the following points: 1. The official or fictitious power. 2. The real State power. 3. Classes. I The Official or Fictitious Power The Soviets In 1871, during the Paris Commune, the world saw an attempt at social organization by the workers themselves. Neighborhood organizations, committees composed of workers in arms, elected their representatives and undertook the creation of a worker militia. Such spontaneous popular organizations were seen again in Russia, in 1905, and then in 1917, when they actually took power. In 1917, the Russian Soviets included all worker tendencies, from social-democrats to anarchists. But the Soviets of the revolutionary period soon disappeared. The organisms that bear the name "Soviets" today and are officially said to be the sources of State power in Russia, really have less power than the French municipal councils. They are no more than organs employed by the central power to execute its orders in the limits of the municipalities. The power of the present Soviets is a farce of power, and the elections to the Soviets are a comical take-off on elections. The last Soviet elections took place at the end of 1934. As in preceding elections, the following happened: 49