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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 50
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 50. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 50. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4747

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 50, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4747.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 50
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_049.jpg
Transcript 1919-1923. The Civil War ended in the total hegemony of Bolshevism. All other organizations were persecuted, suppressed, destroyed. But within the Bolshevik party itself diverse tendencies continued to face one another. There was one political organization, with a semblance of democracy still lingering within it. 1924-1927. Even before Lenin's death, a struggle began among the heads of the Bolshevik Party (Zinoviev, Trotsky, Boukharin, Rykov, Stalin, etc.) This struggle ended in Stalin's victory. Stalin's triumph put an end to the appearance of democracy inside and outside the single party. 1928-1937. The Stalinist absolutism is perfected. We have now a personal dictatorship adapted to the development of the new social form. Why This Evolution? The progressive destruction of the liberty of the Russian workers is not the accidental thing that some people like to think it is. The classic capitalist economy is a disorderly, chaotic economy. It functions like a machine that cannot be controlled by any mechanic. It moves from prosperity to crises, from progress to catastrophe, in pursuance of its own spontaneous laws. Classic capitalism is a "competitive" regime. Rivalry in the conquest of profit entails rivalry in obtaining the manpower that produces this profit. Because of this, the traditional capitalist regime needs a working class that is relatively free—free, at least, to sell its labor power to the best buyer. This liberty to sell one's labor power is possibly not as ludicrous as Karl Marx found it to be. The "chaos" was to be replaced with a "plan". In Russia, we see the birth of an "organized" economy, an economy that is supposedly subjected to man. Labor is regulated "scientifically". All the social wheels, all their movements, follow preestablished circuits. The economy of the country is "directed", obeying the laws imposed by human reason. The single machine functions in accordance with the will of the wise conductors who hold the national levers. A class of specialists, technicians, "initiates"—the brains of the Plan —rules more arbitrarily than any masters have ruled over human beings before. Five or six volumes, comprising a manual of algebraic formulae, summarize for the new masters the entire life of the society, the mainsprings of which they hold in their hands. Economic competition has disappeared within the country. But with that the liberty of the workers has also disappeared. The "plan" is exacting. It brooks no indiscipline. In the "planned" society, every man has a numbered place assigned to him. He is put in his place. He is labelled, controlled. He must do what the top orders him to do. The worker becomes a tiny mathematical symbol in the general plan. His food, his clothing, his fate, are so many graph lines drawn on the charts of the masters of the Plan. Each worker is a disciplined soldier. He is a sort of convict irremediably attached to a determined place, to a determined task, the choice of which he can not question. The laborer works in accordance with the preestablished scheme. The 48