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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 49
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 49. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 49. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4746

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 49, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4746.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 49
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_048.jpg
Transcript camp sometimes holds hundreds of thousands of convicts.7 It is no more or less than the old galley-prison, but a galley-prison that takes in indiscriminately thieves, assassins, prostitutes, saboteurs and political prisoners. That is where Peter will live. The concentration camp is of relatively recent origin. Under Stalin's regime, the number of the imprisoned underwent a steady, formidable increase. It not only became impossible to house them in the prisons on hand, but even to feed them, without bankrupting the State. Therefore, the ingenious G.P.U. invented the commercial galley-enterprise, called concentration camps. Gathered in groups of several tens of thousands in the middle of the swamps that are to be drained and the forests to be cleared, or on the site of the canals that are to be dug, the convicts are housed in Adrian huts, under the guard of the G.P.U. troops. They work, and they are given to eat, in accordance with how much work they do—600, 400 or 200 grams of bread a day. The task to be accomplished is always increased because those who hope to get a diminution of their sentence become "oudarniks" (shock workers). The hardy fellows get along. The weaker brothers croak—since the least slump in productivity brings a reduced portion of bread, and that in turn brings automatically reduced productivity, and so on. But if the work is hard, the "customs" are more so. It is not difficult to imagine what happens when our Peters live in forced promiscuity with prisoners hailing from the underworld. The latter are the only category of convicts that are organized, organized to impose their own law, it is understood. Only vice and the fist count inside the camp; it is impossible to have it otherwise. To escape this situation, Peter has the alternative of suicide or escape. Both will, however, lead to the same end. For you may escape from places of deportation but not from concentration camps. A man deported to Minoossinsk or Narym is surrounded by thousands of square kilometres of wilderness and impenetrable forests. Surveillance over him may therefore be reduced to a minimum. Under Tsarism. we had the terrible secret police called "Okhrana." Under Tsarism there were provocations, deportations, hangings. But we must recognize the Tsarist regime was much less harsh with political (revolutionary) prisoners. Publicity in trials and defense by the accused were permitted. Capital punishment was not employed as widely as now. Deportees were "exploited" to a much smaller extent. Stages in the Destruction of Liberty The evolution in the suppression of the liberty of the Russian workers by the Soviet State may be summarized as follows: 1917-1918. There was integral democracy for the different tendencies of the Russian labor movement. Socialists, quasi-socialists, "socialist-revolutionaries", communists, anarchists—all collaborated in the Soviets, trade unions and other organizations of the revolutionary regime. 7 Hundreds of thousands is not an exaggeration. In one Soviet concentration camp, die one that built the famous White Sea-Baltic Canal, 12,484 prisoners were freed at the end of the job for examplery conduct, while 59,516 others had their sentences reduced for the same reason (decree of the Central Executive Committee, August 4, 1933). It is evident that if 72,000 convicts could distinguish themselves from their fellows, the mass of the latter reached at least 2 or 300,000. 47