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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 48
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 48. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4745.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 48. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4745

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 48, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4745.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 48
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_047.jpg
Transcript that at 2 o'clock in the morning, some agents of the Interior (G.P.U.) searched their home and took along her husband. Where? She will not be told, but she will nevertheless go to bring him some food in the so-called "inner" prison of the G.P.U. The road of repression is so well-known that if anybody disappears you go first to the window of the G.P.U. office rather than to the morgue. For three weeks, for a month, the poor devil awaits his fate in prison. He undergoes all kinds of examinations and may receive no visitors. It is then that the most insignificant details in his past take on the most decisive importance. An investigation reveals that he rarely attended meetings, that he was not a "shock" worker, and attempted to wriggle out of the so-called spontaneous May 1st and November 7th demonstrations. The case is clear. He is a "counter-revolutionary." His wife will then receive from the G.P.U. the only communication she will ever receive in this affair: a notice to bring, on a certain day, at a certain hour, at the North station, warm clothing for her husband. She will then perhaps be glad to be freed from all this uncertainty and learn that he is alive. She will see him at the station for several minutes, before he leaves for Siberia. She will learn that he will be gone for 3 or 5 years. Some letters, permitted at very long intervals, will help her to remember. Such is the story of Peter. Peter is not a great hero. He is not an active revolutionary belonging to a political movement. He is an ordinary worker who merely felt the need of saying aloud—not too loud—what he thought. We defy anybody to deny that Peter's is not a typical and general case. There are few people in Russia who have not had one or several Peters in their family, among their friends or acquaintances. All means of repressions are good for "counter-revolutionaries": deportation, concentration camps, prison, capital punishment. Deportation means exile to Central Asia, Siberia, the Far East, where the climate is so harsh that the free population hardly ever goes there. These are unpeopled regions, with almost no means of communication, far from any frontier. Many Siberian cities owe their origin to the Tsarist political deportations, and Soviet "socialism" continues the work of its predecessor. It peoples the virgin forest and the desert with deportees. It is not difficult to make the deportee give up his opposition in those regions. He cannot leave the district to which he has been assigned. Yet he must work for a living. There he can be worn out with hard labor, or he can be refused any chance to earn enough to survive on. Besides entire villages of peasants exiled for refusing to be "collectivized", it is especially the relatively well-known militants who are deported there. The prison is no more agreeable in Russia than anywhere else. The Soviet prisons are, however, much more crowded. We challenge the Soviet masters to give the number of political prisoners held in their prisons. Capital punishment is exeouted with a shot in the nape of the neck fired by expert professional "socialist" executioners. The minus order is the order prohibiting one from staying in a certain locality. It is inflicted on revolutionaries judged to be dangerous, after they have finished their regular punishment. The concentration camp merits special mention because it is a new thing, because its name is deceiving and because the Russian concentration 46