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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 47
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 47. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4744.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 47. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4744

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 47, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4744.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 47
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_046.jpg
Transcript The Apparatus of Repression Any deviations of opinion, any opposition (even Communist), is branded as counter-revolutionary and as such is severely suppressed. Whether of the right or the left, whether monarchists, fascists, Communist oppositionists, Socialist-revolutionaries, syndicalists or anarchists, all who do not agree with Stalin's orders, are "counter-revolutionaries." The common criminal generally suffers a much lighter penalty than the political delinquent. The first gets a public trial. He has the right to defend himself. He can take advantage of amnesties, etc. The dictatorship fears the free mind much more than the thief and murderer. That is logical. Yet, the reeducation of criminals, thieves and prostitutes, which was one of the boldest ideas of the Revolution, has so degenerated that it is now only a bluff destined for naive visitors. At the present time, criminals and even petty thieves are shot. And according to the law of the 8th of April, 1935, children of 12 are also punished by death. The judges and public prosecutors are as usual people of career and are appointed from above. Like the Soviet magistrature, so the Soviet police. Since the 10th of July, 1934, the G.P.U. has borne the name of "Commissariat of the Interior." This "Commissariat of the Interior" can, in the manner of a simple administrative measure, that is, without any trial, sentence any person to five years of forced labor or exile. This punishment can be renewed indefinitely. The forces of the G.P.U. are specially chosen. They comprise a mobile guard of 100,000 men, forming the best trained and best treated military group in the USSR. Its officers are educated in special schools. A member of the G.P.U. may be permitted to retire, but he is then still attached to the corps and undergoes periodic training and inspection. The G.P.U. network of informers and spies spreads over all the factories, all establishments and even residential houses. Many persons in the Soviet Union assume the role of informer voluntarily—either from ambition, or as a result of political conviction or from jealousy felt for their neighbor. Anybody who has once supplied information to the G.P.U. has his name, address and photo in the bureau, and finds it hard not to continue playing the part of the informer. Denunciation and provocation have become an integral part of the mores and civic virtues of the country, as a result of the prevalent ignoble competition that goes on among citizens of all ranks to get on the good side of the authorities and the Communist Party. Illegal action within such a net is almost a total impossibility. The Soviet citizens must watch carefully his own correspondence, his private conversation, even with those nearest to him. The least imprudence can bring grave consequences. Writing abroad, you must not forget the postal censorship. Here is a classic case in the land of Soviet socialism: Peter, a comrade in your shop or office, a neighbor, a friend, a native of your village, or a relative, has uttered in the course of a little gathering of relatives or friends, one evening over the samovar, some rather circumspect reflections on the troubles of the time. Perhaps he expressed some doubt that such misery can bring well-being and liberty to the workers. His opinion was reported. Three days pass, and you don't see Peter in the shop. You never see him again. From his wife, you learn 45