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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 45
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 45. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4742.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 45. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4742

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 45, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4742.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 45
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_044.jpg
Transcript slogans, on the latest manner of presenting the slogans without risking the sin of "deviation." One is an "artist" or a "writer" in the USSR to the degree that he aids the official propoganda or embellishes the last slogan. A writer with different opinions stops being a writer soon enough, for he cannot be published or even find paper to write on. The theatre still produces some classic plays and several old operas. It thus acts as a sort of museum of art. But outside of that, the theatre, the screen and the radio produce only what suits the "only truth." They are all under the control of the severest of censorships. The intensity of the official propaganda is so great that it is not only impossible to hear or see anything but the eternal "only truth"—in the factory, lunchroom, at home, in the street, in the movie house, in the newspapers, in books, in the city or in the countryside. It is impossible to avoid hearing and seeing it. Evening courses on "political thought" pursue you at night, into your home. You always need to prove your power of assimilation as a good wide-awake citizen. Orators, writers, actors, cinema players, form an army whose job it is to shape the thought of the population. Stalin found the right word when in his wisdom he applied the title of "engineers of the soul" to his Soviet writers. It is not safe to express your own opinion either in speech or in writing. Only the official organizations may hold public meetings. But even the official organizations—the Soviets, trade-unions, etc.—cannot meet without the control of the Party. The speakers are designated in advance by a superior rank of the organization. The same organs dictate the decisions to be reached at such meetings. Anybody may take the floor. The only condition is that you speak in agreement with the official decision. You may also ask questions, but you must do so orally or sign your name to the written question. There is much criticism at meetings. Everybody criticizes violently and constantly. There is no country where you have so much criticism. But this criticism is directed exclusively against persons who are said not to apply diligently enough the line decided on by the top. Not a meeting passes without the discovery of lukewarmness in a neighbor in the accomplishment of his task. To criticize your neighbor means to push yourself to the fore. You criticize in order to take away a good position from another man, to replace him. These frequent bitter public criticisms call for great pliability on the part of people who want to keep the confidence of the top. The best way to deal with criticism in Russia is to anticipate it or to accept it. When you know yourself to be in danger, you accuse yourself in time. You do it publicly and energetically. You try to do it louder than your critics. You recognize all your errors, though they may be non-existent, and after the theatrical mea-culpa, you express your decision to correct yourself, applying all your strength to the triumph of the line. That is what is called "self-criticism." Not everybody has the mentality permitting him to play this vile comedy easily. But when you want to keep a good position, moral fastidiousness is not an asset. It is especially difficult for the population to escape this intellectual 43