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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 44
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 44. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 44. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4741

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 44, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 44
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_043.jpg
Transcript II Collective Liberty All education in Russia is based on the principle that the mind of the individual should be fashioned at will to suit the needs of the government. The masters of the Soviet State, by definition, are the exclusive possessors of the truth. The only truth and the course to be followed in applying it are decided by the directing elite. The population must be adapted to this truth. Man is clay to be kneaded in accordance with the masters' desire. On one hand, we have the initiate, and on the other, the general population, docile in the hands of the initiate. Thus from the kindergarten to the university, nobody learns to think for himself. The injunction is not "Think!" but "Think this and only this!" The same themes are repeated in the wall pictures of the nurseries, in the books of the elementary schools, in the courses of higher schools. There is one catechism, the catechism of "Leninism-Stalinism." To get to the highest schools, to arrive at desirable positions, and to hold on to the post already won, it is best to know well the catechism. In university entrance examinations, the most important questions deal with "Leninist-Stalinist" policy. It is good to have a fundamental acquaintance with the orthodoxy of the moment. For every deviation from, this theory is heresy, and any person showing himself guilty of heresy, even in private conversation, loses his position. Provident, "go-getter" parents therefore put their children, at the age of 5, in the "Octobrist Children's" corps. At the age of 8, good children enter the "Pioneers," later the Communist Youth and finally the Party. The Party card is the indispensable talisman for any person who wants to make his way in the world. The Communist Party is therefore the object of a constant rush. The government trade-unions, membership in which is practically obligatory, fulfill one of the lower functions in the regime. Their purpose is merely to educate the workers in the spirit of the dictatorship, to organize them for greater production and to extract from them money in the form of "loans" and "voluntary" unpaid hours of work. Originally the trade-unions were organs of opposition. They constitute now an important lever for the State power. Who better than trade-union functionaries can confuse and keep in line the working population? Head-Fixing A multitude of newspapers circulate in the USSR. The Pravda, the central organ of the Party, has numerous brothers all over the country. Every factory issues its special sheet. But of all these publications—local, district, central, factory, sport, Party, trade-unions, Communist Youth, Red Army—of all the 10,000 publications, not one prints a line that is not in total conformity with the official opinion of the moment. The same tone, the same style, the same political line, the same words. Every day an unsigned leading article reproduces under 10,000 different titles what one must think and say on that day to be "in line." Professional orators are a mighty host in the USSR. They study the technique of their trade in special schools. Their function is to spread orally the same "only truth" found in the papers. They are furnished with special periodicals and pamphlets which keep them informed on the last 42