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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 43
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 43. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 43. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4740

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 43, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4740.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 43
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_042.jpg
Transcript Indeed, only the fine people charged with official missions, that is, diplomats, athletes, literateurs obtain foreign passports. For the common mortal, requesting such a passport not only means spending 30 roubles for nothing. It is also a sign that he is discontented. And that is a serious matter. You can, however, leave Russia in spite of that, but only if you are "ransomed" from abroad with a sum of $300 paid in foreign money, which is certainly not accessible to many people. There remains one means of leaving Russia. Illegal flight. But against such practice, we have the decree of June 6, 1934, dealing with hostages. Here are the provisions of the law: 1. Passing the frontier without a passport is punishable with death or ten years of prison for civilians, and exclusively with death for the military. 2. The adult members of the family of a military deserter are punished with 5 to 10 years' prison if they knew of the desertion without informing it, and if they did not know of it, with 5 years in Siberia. 3. If a military man has not informed of an escape, he is liable to 10 years' prison. If he is a civilian, the non-informer is subject to the provisions of the law dealing with crime against the State. Let us remember that this refers to peace-time. This explains why we never meet in the West Soviet citizens who are ready to tell the truth about the Bolshevik regime. The fact that such measures are taken shows how great is the general desire to leave the USSR. Military Service The so-called red army is organized in the same manner as other armies. Chiefs are not elected. They are appointed from above. Speaking to a common soldier, Soviet officers may address him as "comrade so and so". Otherwise, there is the usual distance between officers and men. The Soviet officer can inflict punishment on the soldier. The latter may complain, but only after he has undergone the punishment that his superior has assigned him. Serious breaches of discipline are brought before a court-martial and may lead to acquaintance with the execution squad. Discipline is as rigorous as elsewhere. The only advantage over the old Tsarist army is that the soldier may not be whipped. Military service is obligatory. The active army was increased in 1934 from 600,000 to 940.000 men and then in 1936 to 1,200,000. The length of service is from 1 to 5 years, depending on the branch and the individual case of the conscript. The draft is effected with the aid of a lottery. Every year about 300,000 new soldiers are conscripted. The men who are not drafted—and there must be many of them, considering the size of the population—go through, for a short period, a simplified course of military training in their localities. All students must take part in this training and pass military examinations. They receive the rank of sub-lieutenant of the reserve after a year of service. 41