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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 42
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 42. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 42. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4739

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 42, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 42
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_041.jpg
Transcript On the other hand, some persons are always indispensable. Such individuals are taken in hand by the factory police, instead of being fired for lateness or staying away without official permission. In certain large factories and railway depots there were in 1933 special detention rooms for these cases. There qualified workers and technicians who wanted to leave their place of work were locked up for safe-keeping after work hours. Malingering can be punished with imprisonment, and when the authorities want to "burn" somebody, they often do it under the pretext of "premeditated, systematic and voluntary malingering." This amounts to sabotaging the "socialist" economy and is a very grave matter. Workers who cannot stand any more of their job try to save themselves the day after pay, but that means the loss of 10 to 20 days of wages, as the Soviet worker never collects all of his two weeks' pay. His bosses hold back on him a greater part of his wages than the most authoritary capitalists have ever dared to keep. But when you cannot stand the job any longer, the fear of losing 20 days pay would not stop you from escaping, if the need of having a regular passport, regular military booklets and work did not oblige you, in that case, to a quasi-illegal life, with the sovkhoses and distant public works as your only resource. In spite of that, such escapes do occur. The peasant is no more favored. Changing a kolkhos or leaving one is as hard as changing a job in a factory. Since everything that the peasant possessed has been "collectivized," he would lose his all, or nearly all, if he left. Leaving with nothing, the peasant has no hope of creating for himself a new personal enterprise and faces few chances of finding a place in another kolkhos. The worker is bound to the factory as much as the peasant is to the soil. He can change his place of work or domicile of his own accord only at the risk of difficulties that exceed by far those he met under Tsarism. And neither can the worker oppose himself to the migrations found necessary by the "plan." Is that anything but serfdom? The great movements of population observed by the foreigner travelling in Russia do not in any way contradict what we have just stated. The railway trains are crowded because they are small in number for such a large country, where roads and automobiles are relatively few. The forced industrialization calls for much man-power. More than 15 million persons were drawn from the countryside to the city. Every new industrial center necessitates the construction of a new city, with large and frequent displacements of construction workers. Then there is the constant movement of the vast army of liaison, control and inspection agents that the State needs to keep functioning an immense enterprise like the USSR. Forbidden to Leave Russia If there is the need of a passport to move around inside of Russia, a passport is quite naturally needed to leave Russia. Everybody, even a worker, can ask for a passport to go abroad, but this request must be accompanied with a payment of 230 roubles (a month and a half of the average worker's wages). After a month or two of waiting, they return you 200 roubles, 30 roubles less than what you have given them and . . . you are refused a passport. 40