Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 40
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 40. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 40. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4737

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 40, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 40
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_039.jpg
Transcript separately—although the distinction is quite artificial—first, the degree of personal liberty (home, work, security, the right to dispose of one's person) allowed to the Russian worker, and, second, the degree of collective liberty (speech, opinion, press, congregation, vote, education) he enjoys. Personal Liberty Security of the Home Whether he lives in a "cooperative" house, directed by a centralized organism or in a "common" house, managed by the bureau of lodgings of his factory, the worker is always under the thumb of the all powerful centralized organism or of the Communist president of the so-called "house committee." Should he for one reason or another displease these powers, he is subject to all manner and means of attention, visits, inspections; he is moved from one lodging to another; his masters discover that his apartment is too large or that it does not suit him. The quest to discredit the tenant, to raise the house committee or corresponding central organism against him, is incessant, reflecting the terrible housing shortage. In the "common" house, the eviction that follows automatically, according to the law, the loss of a job, emphasizes the new form of serfdom and has the effect of chaining the workers to their places of work. In the case of the slightest slip in the expression of one's political opinion, the "new social order" is implacable. The sinners and their families then have no right at all. The worker enjoys only relative security in his home, or what serves him for a home. Attached to the Factory The factory has always been a cursed spot for the worker. It has always been for the worker a place where he must toil against his will. The Soviet factory remains that for the Russian worker. The management is the absolute boss both in fact and according to the new law. The thing that first surprises you is the presence of an armed uniformed guard at the factory gate. This guard, controlled by the police (G.P.U.) challenges workers who forget to show their passes in the language used by armed factory guards everywhere. The factory pass, which is renewed every month and bears the photo of the worker holding it, must be shown to the armed guards also on leaving the place of work. And since it is important to fill the workers' minds with a wholesome respect for this bit of discipline, the loss of the factory pass is made punishable with a fine of 3 roubles and more (the card itself costs a few kopeks.) This loss therefore equals a day's work in the case of the badly paid workers. The fine does not save the worker the need of paying, at a special window opening to the outside, the price of a new pass, including a photograph. To get hired at a factory, the worker stands in line at several barred windows, where he presents the following documents: an interior passport, a work certificate, his military booklet and two recent photos (up to 1935 he had to show also his food-card certificate.) Then he answers in writing a questionnaire of 60 to 70 questions. 38