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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 39
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 39. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 39. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4736

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 39, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 39
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_038.jpg
Transcript 1. The great Slavic population in the United States and other Western countries has proved itself in no way inferior to other peoples as workers. The Russian adapts himself to all conditions, including those of production. 2. All the foreigners we have known (workers and technicians) showed themselves more awkward and unproductive than the Russians under the Soviet regime of work. They spent much time complaining that they did not have on hand the things they were accustomed to in their own country. Their inability to understand Russian conditions helped to add to the misery of the population of Russia. 3. The Russian as a worker demands very little in exchange for his labor. But what he gets today is infinitely below his meager needs and below what he received before. "Oudarnism" and "stakhanovism" attained the unusual in this respect. No society has ever dared to legalize and raise to the level of a State virtue the utilization of the strong-armed and the big-bodied in order to augment the intensity of labor. To those that ask: "What is the level of the rate of labor in the USSR?" we can answer without hesitancy: "Everywhere in the country, the rate of labor attains the maximum possible given the machinery, the quality of the raw material, the professional experience and the degree of alimentation of the workers. Between the Russian rate of 1913 and that of today, there is an acceleration at least as great as that in the Western countries between the same periods." In his Reflections on the USSR, 1936, page 19, Ernest Mercier writes: "In the Moscow factories making electrical material, the average activity of the workers seems somewhat superior to that of their Parisian brothers." The electricity magnate knows his business. There are two opponents facing each other in the Soviet factory. On one side is the State apparatus. It commands to have its five-year plan accomplished at a faster and faster rate and at a lower cost. On the other side are the workers. They offer a silent resistance to the slave-drivers. They strive with all their energy to get more for their labor. It is the old struggle between those on the bottom and those on the top. Part Two THE LEVEL OF LIBERTY OF THE WORKER IN THE USSR We have examined the standard of living of the Soviet worker. The question that we shall try to answer now is: "How much liberty does the Russian worker enjoy?" It should be quite obvious that we shall not be able to determine if the present regime is a socialist regime, or if it is moving in the direction of socialism, by measuring the area covered by the new Russan factories, or by discussing the latest official "theses". We shall come nearer the truth by observing how much real liberty the worker enjoys in his daily life. What may be called socialism has no meaning unless it signifies Well-being and Liberty for the majority of the population. In order to present the facts as clearly as possible, we shall examine 37