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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 38
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 38. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 38. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4735

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 38, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 38
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_037.jpg
Transcript cree" to "offer" their pay for the extra day of work to "aviation" or "the red army". This practice is widespread. In 1933, in the metallurgical factory in Moscow where I was employed, all shifts were gotten to "vote" to work for a month's time without rest, in order to make up for the time lost during the revolutionary holidays of November 7 and 8. Both the day and night shifts worked for four successive "Sundays". The first three rest days were paid; the fourth was "offered" to aviation. You can imagine the workers' fatigue at the end of the month. At no meeting where these "offers" are asked for by the management, through the trade union officials, is there any refusal on the part of the workers. You can chalk this up either to enthusiasm or prudence, as you please. In the shape of "Communist Saturdays" the workers are also made to "offer" to work for nothing on their rest days outside of the factory: digging potatoes in the country, working on roads, shoveling in the subway, etc. A considerable part of the worker's free time is taken up by public meetings. The number of such meetings is great. They are held in the shop itself or at the factory club. Attendance, as we shall see, is practically obligatory. In the main branches of industry three shifts, seven hours each, is the rule. Each shift works in rotation night, evening and day. The Intensity of Labor Soviet Russia is the outstanding land of "rationalization". Piece work and the belt system dominate the economic process. The working arrangement that is being emphasized at present, partly as a result of stakhanov- ism, is piece work with prizes for overproduction. Here is a "sweating system" that old-fashioned capitalism has not succeeded in imposing on its workers. The clever Soviet masters have established in their factories an atmosphere that urges you to work faster and faster. Everywhere your eyes meet red signs: "Produce in 7 hours more than in 8!", "Not a minute to lose", etc. These slogans are found even on the machines. They obsess the worker. In the least important factories, there are special functionaries occupied in timing the workers and determining the maximum averages on the basis of which the required norms of output are established and the piece-work prices are fixed. Every unproductive minute of the worker must be made up. Every unproductive movement must be suppressed. The desire of the masters is to surpass Ford. And more elsewhere, the bosses are ready to recognize that these unproductive movements constitute a half-rest, a relaxation for the organism. The narrowmindedness of some Westerners—especially Frenchmen— has led them to speak superciliously of the incapacity and negligence of the Russian. Is there anything more despairing than the example of these revolutionaries—some of whom even work for a living—who reproach the Russian workers for not laboring intensively enough? In reality, we find that: 36