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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 36
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 36. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 36. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4733

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 36, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4733.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 36
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_035.jpg
Transcript The "social securities" are favors that the all-powerful State-employer grants or does not grant. They are alms thrown to the pariahs it exploits. And since the new Moloch is much more exacting than the old, the State-employer wills to have everything utilized "rationally." Even repose, distributed so meagerly among the workers, is transformed, in the name of science, into a system of political education, into exercises for the increase of productivity and preparation for military service. IV Conditions of Work We have considered the lodging, food, and wages of the Russian worker. It remains for us to see what labor is gotten out of him in exchange. The Work Week Up to 1929-1930, the week was seven days long, as elsewhere. You rested on Sundays and revolutionary and religious holidays. At the beginning of the first five-year plan, however, the master minds in charge of Russia thought they had discovered an easy way of overtaking America. The idea was logically irreproachable. It was brilliant. The instruments of production were to be kept in motion during the entire year without interruption. With this purpose, the week became a mobile week five days long. Each day became a holiday for a fifth of the workers. There were no more "Sundays". The street was expected to become uniform, no more or less lively, from one end of the year to another. The life of man was going to resemble the life of ants. It is true that this arrangement created widespread inconvenience. Your day off did not coincide with that of your wife or children. It became impossible for two or three friends to get together. But of what account was that from the angle of the grandiose economic machine that was going to function day and night, the whole year round, realizing greater gain by using its equipment more rapidly? For two or three years the utmost was done to impose the five-day week on the country. The efforts included the imprisonment and shooting of obstinate "saboteurs", an object lesson to those who might dare not to abide by the new calendar. Happily enough experience proved in time that logic and practice do not always go together. A fifth of the country's workers were changed daily, with the result that the shifts produced less, the machines suffered more damage than usual. There was no more time to repair the broken-down machinery. Indeed, more than a 100% reserve of machinery would have been necessary if the five-day week had been permitted to continue. Finally, after much effort and expense, a retreat was made to the fixed week. Toward 1931-1932, a fixed week of six days was established. This is the rule in the cities at the present time. The days of rest for everybody are the 6th, 12th, 18th, 24th and 30th of each month. There are besides five revolutionary holidays every year: the 1st and 2nd of May, the 7th and 8th of November and 22nd of January. Beginning with 1937, the 5th of December has been a holiday, commemorating the accepting of the new constitution. 34