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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 35
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 35. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 35. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4732

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 35, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 35
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_034.jpg
Transcript secretary-general of the Central Committee of the trade-unions, gave: 1 for 380 1 for 114 The general figures for all workers (excluding peasants) tell of 1 for every 500 taking advantage of beaches and sea-side resorts; 1 for every 140 going to sanatoriums; 1 for every 20 going to houses of rest, which are for the most part, the barracks of rest found in the immediate vicinity of the cities. According to the Izviestia of 1-2-35, the total figures for 1934 hardly exceeded the 1932 figures, while the worker population had greatly increased in that time. There is therefore no change for the better in the proportions given above. The official statement calls for the following remarks: 1. The members of the family are not included, and if we multiply by three the number of wage workers, in order to get the number of inhabitants, we find that in a city of 3 millions, as Moscow, about 2.000 have enjoyed, free of charge or with part payment, the beaches and sea-side resorts, 7,000 the sanatoriums and 50,000 the neighborhood rest homes. (In reality, the figures for Moscow are much higher, to the disadvantage of the provinces, as there are many more notables in Moscow.) The vacation camps for school children have to be paid for by the children's parents. Bringing into our calculation the number of children at such camps would not change the order of our figures, since the coefficient 3 that we have used is a minimum for the USSR. 2. Under the name "worker" are included, in mine and factory, workers as well as their bosses, technicians and office managers. A simple visit to the sea-side resorts, beaches and rest houses will show the following. The more "comfortable" is the rest offered at a place, the greater the proportion of the responsibles and technicians vacationing there. We find ourselves starting with the zero of comfort in the rest barracks of the third order (which are the appanage of the steady workers at the base of the system and the super-oudarniks). We reach 100% of comfort in the fashionable beaches and sea-side resorts monopolized by the higher-ups. 3. The figures given above do not indicate how many of the "free" vacations are partly paid for. In other words, the Soviet "salary supplement," so glorified in the West, is an enormous bluff. The 30% of the wages that it should constitute is reduced to some 6-7%, unequally distributed, and the evolution of the "salary supplement" indicates clearly that its value decreases alongside the real wages. The heading "Pensions and Various Indemnities" represented only two-thirds of the budget for "Social Security" in 1929. Today it represents only a third. The rates of sickness benefit and accident benefit have been reduced. Pensions have undergone a radical revision downward. At the same time new direct taxes (10% of the wage) have been laid on the population. The "salary supplement" contributes to implant a new illusion in the mind of the people: everybody possesses the common property, but each enjoys it unequally. In fact, the big functionary finds himself in a situation where in the name of workers' security, he does not even need to economize for the future. The new society guarantees him his material privileges for life. 33