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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 34
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 34. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4731.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 34. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4731

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 34, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4731.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_033.jpg
Transcript room. His little pavillion opens into the park. There the bill of fare is varied and subtle. There you have soft-stepping servants. No vacationing in soul-forming factories for the worthies who manufacture the souls of others! They can idle as long as they want to on their restricted beaches or in the special parks protected from intruders by long walls. They get everything that is worth while in a so-called "bourgeois" vacation. The "Livadia" of the common folk is the best institution of its kind. Yet you could not think of anything worse than the common people's halls of repose where, besides discipline, poverty, cockroaches and bed bugs hold sway. Because the "free" vacations in the village are full of nearly insurmountable difficulties—the peasant selling very dear the little produce that the State leaves him—the city worker has no choice but to solicit for himself a place in the "barracks for workers' repose." For the sake of a bit of fresh air, you must learn to bear it. Let us see now how this "organized" rest is distributed to the workers and how many get it. In the first place, it is not free to all. Some pay absolutely nothing. Some pay half of the transportation. Others pay all of the transportation. Others pay for a part of the stay at the vacation resorts. Still others for all of it. How much the worker has to pay for his vacation and how much of it he gets free has no connection with his income. It depends only on his utility to the regime, on how much "pull" he can muster, and, to some extent, on luck. Every year, through the intermediary of the trade-unions, the factory receives a definite number of "permissions to rest" (free, partly free and paying) to be distributed among the workers. On page 22 of the pamphlet quoted above we find details telling how these chances of a vacation are distributed: The trade-union officials of the Poutilov factory* give their opinion of a candidate (for a vacation) only after having examined minutely how he filled the norms of production, what was the quality of his work and what his social activity? Was he the best oudarnik? . . . As can be seen, at the Poutilov factory we have taken the best way of choosing those who have a right to the houses of rest, sanatoriums, beaches and sea-side resorts . . . Everybody has the right to declare his candidacy for a vacation, but whether you are chosen depends to a very small extent on your state of health. If you are not a "notable," be at least a "super-oudarnik," and you will have some chance of success. To learn the number of lucky candidates, we shall examine the official statistics. They show the following proportions for 19326: BEACHES and SEA-SIDE RESORTS SANATORIUMS Mine workers „ 1 for 200 1 for 60 Textile 1 for 435 1 for 140 Education 1 for 1400 1 for 290 Clerks 1 for 1660 1 for 500 For heavy industry (including the mines) in 1934, Shchvernik, the 5The large Leningrad factory, employing 30 to 40 thousand metal workers. 6 A pamphlet issued by the trade-unions in 1933: The Standard of Living of the Soviet Workers Rises, page 64. 32