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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 32
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 32. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4729.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 32. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4729

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 32, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4729.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 32
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_031.jpg
Transcript acknowledged. Yet only 65 beds are devoted to them and there is no special establishment for such cases . . . " In spite of these facts, the State-employer does not hesitate to describe such misery as a "salary supplement." Yes, the Soviet recipient of "social security" and his family have a right to free hospitalization and medical care. But there are rights and rights. The "notables" of the Soviet regime also have a right to free hospitalization and medical care. They get this convenience in the incomparable establishments found within the Kremlin area. In those hospitals the patient receives the utmost of attention and comfort. There it is useless to want to choose your doctors, because you find gathered in one place the greatest exponents of the medical and surgical art in the country. The poor devil of a worker, on the other hand, gets the medical attention and hospitalization that poor people everywhere receive in the crowded infirmaries destined for them. Lying in his hospital, the Soviet worker keeps up his strength with the wheat bread that friends and relatives bring him from outside. We can guess the reason why the Soviet authorities hide so assiduously the part of the public-health and "social security" budgets devoted to the care of the "notables" of the regime. The figures for the entire population are put under the same heading. So that at first sight it appears that we are dealing here with a society that has never been approximated for unity and equality of opportunity. In reality, however, the medical services, said to be supported by the entire "socialist community," are very unequally distributed, and always in favor of the citizen with the "function,"—an arrangement that has seemingly replaced private property as a means of social and material advantage. A half-billion roubles is applied to the construction and upkeep of houses of rest, sanatoriums, "Rivieras" and sea-side resorts. These establishments are more comfortable, more private, more peaceful, the higher the "social function" of the people for whom they are destined. Indeed, all Soviet vacationers breathe the same air. They tan themselves under the same sun and bathe in the same Black Sea. But that is only because science and technology have not yet succeeded in partitioning the air, the sun and the Black Sea. Excepting for that unavoidable characteristic, one kind of vacation place is different from the other kind in every way imaginable: food, comfort, insistence on "discipline," service, privacy, etc. In Crimea, on the Russian Riviera, you will find "Livadia," an old residence of the Tsar. It has been transformed into a house of rest for the people. What a fine symbol! But what do we find in reality? The rooms have become dormitories, mess halls, "big-house" exercise yards. The place has been turned into "barracks of rest" for the common folk. Going to that institution with your family is out of question; you cannot even choose your cot neighbor in those dormitories, each of which holds 30 to 40 sleepers. You dare not tarry too long on the beach or in the surrounding woods, for fear of losing your meal or being disciplined. And there is your obligation to follow with regularity the political courses and the artistical-educative exercises that will endow your body with a perfectly policed mind. Professional hygienists and sociologists have 30