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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 30
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 30. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 30. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4727

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 30, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_029.jpg
Transcript test every pension claimed by invalid workers. The Institute declared in Izviestia, September 17, 1934: "Four years of experience have shown us that nearly all invalids are capable of working and we occupy ourselves specially with the task of bringing them back to work . . . Science gives the word (invalidity) an entirely relative significance and permits us to return to production a great number of our invalids . . That is, in accordance with the needs of its budget, the State sets "science" to work to diminish and void the allowances granted to pensioned invalids. No law, no Parliament is needed here. "Science" in the service of the State-employer is sufficient for the job. In 1933 we heard the spokesmen of the State trade-unions answer retired aged workers who in the utmost of misery begged for the favor of being allowed to buy their food in the—then cheaper—lunchroom of the same factory to which they had given the best of their life: "If you want to improve your condition, comrades, return to the shop. We shall find you some light tasks. Otherwise, it is impossible to permit you to buy your meals in the lunchroom. You know it is only for those who work!" And that was true. The trade-union committee of the factory could not accord such a "favor," for the factory lunchroom was furnished as many portions of food as there were active workers in the shop. The worker's pension varies from 25 to 50 roubles a month. It is rarely greater. A few old super-oudarniks may attain 70-80 roubles. The worker's pension is personal. It deprives the worker of the right to eat in the factory lunchroom, but does not free him from the necessity of paying for his lodging. It is granted to the worker himself. On the other hand, with a simple stroke of the pen, the higher organs of the State will give to the widows and children of the eminent personalities of the regime (Party officials, administrators, technicians, professors, etc. . . . ) pensions from 250 to 1,000 roubles and more a month, besides other very advantageous privileges, as that of enjoying an apartment or a villa, allowed for life to the family of the "notable" of the "socialist" State. On the other side of the barricade, the widow and children of the worker have the privilege of going to the factory or the settlements run by the "Public Aid." This explains the employment of the first two billions of the budget for "Social Security." Let us pass on to the remaining billions. II.—What immediately strikes one upon considering the use to which the other two billions are applied is that they are put to purposes that may be very useful but which up to now no society, not even capitalist society, has had the gall to qualify as "Social Security" or an "addition to the wages." For some of the money, the State constructs houses that are most often occupied by the privileged section of Soviet society and where rent is paid, as elsewhere, and that is called social security! More: the construction and upkeep of public parks—baptised for the occasion "gardens of culture and rest"—and athletic stadiums, where you must pay to enter, are also described as an addition to the "socialist" wages! 28