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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 28
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 28. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 28. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4725

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 28, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4725.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 28
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_027.jpg
Transcript years in one factory and three years at his trade, he will get 100% of his wages from the start. But if he has been in the factory less than a year, he will get only two-thirds of his wages during his period of illness. This is merely a good way of binding the worker to his place of work. The State-employer also finds it a convenient way of diminishing the social security benefits to be paid in this epoch, when so many new workers flock to the factories. More than half of the workers cannot fulfill the required conditions. Unionized seasonal workers (building trades in general, masons, carpenters, excavators—there is no construction during the five months of the very rigorous winter) collect, according to their length of stay in the trade, either two-thirds or three-quarters of their wages during the first 20 days, then 100%, but for not more than 75 days altogether. Other workers are paid till the time of their complete reestablishment in health or till they pass into the category of invalids. The "oudarniks" and the "decorated" workers enjoy a certain advantage. They must get 100% of their wages from the first day they become incapacitated. Miners, on the other hand, can lay claim to their entire wage during the period of invalidity only if they have achieved the full norms required in the tasks assigned to them for the two months preceding the accident or illness. Making the rate of sick-benefit depend on the rate of work is an innovation that only Soviet "socialism" has found fit to inscribe on its list of assets. Similarly, the right to go on living in case of illness is made to depend on the worker's "good behavior" in the shop. Workers who have left their factory without the consent of the management or workers who have been fired with a "motive" (breach of factory discipline) have no right to social security benefits and lose, when they get a new job, their claim to previous service in the trade. The rate of social security aid is established on the basis of the entire salary (includes bonuses), but public holidays are not paid for. Formerly, it was impossible to collect more than 300 roubles a month as a social security benefit. Thus the recipients of the big salaries were somewhat "inconvenienced" in case of illness. At present, limits of this sort hold good only for clerks, properly so called. On the other hand, "workers" like technicians, specialists in commerce, industry, agriculture or accounting, as well as holders of decorations, have no maximum limit. This way the wide differences in income are carried over into the sphere of social security. Among the acquisitions of the revolution which the State-employer has, on the face of it, not dared to touch are: the annual vacation for all workers and the maternity rest allowed to women workers. Every worker has a right to a yearly vacation of 12 paid work-days. In unhealthful occupations the worker is entitled to 24 free days. The big specialists and responsible "employees" also take advantage of this provision, probably in compensation for the energy they expend in administrating the workers. Before the era of the five-year plans, the two weeks' vacation actually amounted to the addition of about 4% to the worker's wages, the real value of which was much higher than today. At the present time, the State-employer compensates itself quite liberally for this 4% with the 26