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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 26
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 26. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4723.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 26. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4723

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 26, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4723.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_025.jpg
Transcript "Trade-union" assessment (as membership in the State "trade-unions" is practically obligatory) : 2% of the wage. State Loan (theoretically free, but in practice obligatory) : 10% of the wage. Assessments (actually obligatory) for various societies and social enterprises: 1% of the wage. We see that altogether from 15 to 21% of the worker's wages is taken out of the worker's pay envelope even before the payment of the wage is made. This is money that the worker never sees. This can be verified by examining the pay books of any factory. Alongside of these direct taxes, we find very high indirect taxes on wine, tobacco and alcohol. The Soviet State has not passed up the chance to poison its people with vodka (grain alcohol) in order to bolster up its budget. There is something archaic about the existence of all these taxes, since the State, having a monopoly of the exchange of commodities, takes what it wants from the producer as well as from the consumer by arbitrarily fixing all prices. In 1935, for example, the Soviet State bought rye from the peasant at 6.5 kopeks a kilo and resold it as flour in Moscow at 2.10 roubles a kilo and as bread at a rouble a kilo. (The rouble contains one hundred kopeks.) Additions to Soviet Wages (Social Security) The legend of the Soviet "salary supplement" is so widely spread that we must deal with it in detail. In his calculation of production prices, every factory director or head of a Soviet enterprise adds 30 kopeks to each rouble written down for wages. These 30 kopeks are put under the heading of "Social Security." The State Bank effects the transfer of these sums to the various State organisms concerned. It is natural for us to be interested in the following question (or questions) : What does this 30% of the workers' wages represent? Where does this sum really go? Who profits by it? To find an answer, we shall have to take a close look at the official budget for "Social Security." Now there exists no public Soviet budget that tells the manner of distribution of the 30% deducted in this way from the product of labor—and for a very good reason! A published budget of this kind would have to mention that a part of the money it disposes of is devoted to certain purposes that are hardly worthy of a government labelling itself as "proletarian." We are therefore obliged to refer only to the admitted budget for "Social Security." Such a document was published in Izviestia, of July 9, 1935. Its total of about 9 billion roubles indicates that half of the money collected for "Social Security" did not figure in the expenditures given under the same heading, since 30% of the wages of the USSR2 represents at least twelve billion roubles. In order to make clearer our study of the question, we shall distribute 2About 40 billion in 1935. (Zhdanov's speech, Leningrad Pravda, December 26, 1934.) 24