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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 23
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 23. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4720.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4720

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 23, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4720.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_022.jpg
Transcript buckwheat 4.30 millet 2.10 rice - 6.00 sugar 4.70 wheat groats 4.50 MOSCOW PRICES AT THE BEGINNING OF 1937, IN ROUBLES, A KILO: (2.2 LBS.) wheat bread 1.70 rye bread 0.85 meat for stew 6 to 7 butler 16 oleomargarine 10 to 11 edible oil 13 to 14 These are prices paid by all buyers, including the unfortunates who must make both ends meet on a monthly wage of 80 to 200 roubles. To get an exact idea of the situation that the Russian worker finds himself in, compare these figures with those of your own budget. And remember: the prices given in the last table are Moscow prices. They are often quite different in the provinces, with the ratio always favoring Moscow. Many Westerners have permitted themselves the cruelty of saying that the present misery of the Russian worker is an improvement as compared to the time of the Tsar. It is true that the Russian worker was badly housed before the revolution. But he ate abundantly. The Russian is a big eater. The Russian worker, under Tsarism, had a simple but plentiful fare. Foodstuffs were cheap. Daily he ate his stew and kasha. He had sugar, lard, cabbage, tea, and good bread in large quantity. In 1925-1927, in the last years of the Nep, this standard of alimentation was even surpassed. It then fell radically, affecting the entire population, including the peasants, the oldest of whom cannot recall similar distress. What is the cause of this condition? It is accounted for, in part, by the State's program of boundless industrialization, consisting of the forced development of heavy industry and the manufacture of means of production rather than means of subsistence. Another reason is the forced "collectivization" of the countryside in the four years from 1929 to 1933, which led, among other things, to the disappearance of more than half of the cattle. Artisan production was well developed in old and Nep Russia. The peasant who busied himself as an artisan producer during the long winter months was almost self-sufficient. In the name of "organized" economy, the artisan production of Russia was destroyed. Almost instantly, industry was facing needs that it could not satisfy. During that period, the hurried exportation of grain, fish, butter, eggs, oils, flax, etc. paid for the importation of machines. I remember how in 1931, while I was working at the loading of salt fish to be shipped abroad from a Soviet port, the "accidental" breaking of a cask was like a gift from heaven to the famished longshoremen. We rushed to pick up the pieces of fish, though some of it had landed in the mud. The "shortage" found in the USSR is, therefore, not a natural product. It is the exclusive result of the will and acts of the masters of the country. They say that they know best what is good for humanity. They say that they know best the ways leading to what is good for humanity. Coldly, pitilessly, they impose their "truth" on the helpless country. 21