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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 21
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 21. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4718

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 21, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_020.jpg
Transcript his already weighed down person by the "organized" method of food distribution. However, the rye bread which cost him 60 kopeoks a kilo before the reform, he must buy now at 85 kopecks a kilo. The same change occurred in the prices of other necessaries. His wage, on the other hand, rose at the same time only 10 to 15%. What Does the Soviet Worker Eat? What are the food-stuffs that the Russian worker can buy and in what quantities does he buy them? Below is the worker's ration in 1934. That is, this is what he had the right to buy for himself and his family in the "distributor". WORKERS CLERKS AND HOUSEWIVES CHILDREN Wheat bread Rye bread Meat including bones Butter and fat Sugar Dry legumes Potatoes 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 — 0.5 0.8 0.4 0.8 0.4 1st. cat. 2nd cat. Daily ration in kilos: (1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds) 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 Monthly ration in kilos: 2 1 0.4 0.4 1 1 1 0.5 irregularly, a rare food You can see from this table that there is one member of Soviet society who is even worse off than the worker. It is the Soviet "employee", the clerk, who had no other source of provisioning than the "distributor" in 1934. It is important to have the worker believe that the revolution brought him something. He is not entirely at the foot of the ladder. Is not the "employee", the small clerk, more unfortunate? The Bolsheviks have ever been exceedingly clever. On the basis of the rations given above, the ordinary Russian worker was obliged — and is obliged now, with the modified mode of distribution — to content himself with the following daily menu: WAGE EARNER Breakfast (before 8 o'clock) Lunch (at noon) Dinner (5 P.M.) tea and bread factory meal or when he does not work: tea and bread soup and kasha NON-WAGE EARNER (WIFE AND children} tea tea and bread soup and kasha or: tea and bread tea and bread Supper (8 P.M.) tea and bread Tea is often a simple extract of dried carrots or dried wild fruit. Sugar is rare. We may say that most of the population have been reduced to bread and water. It will be hard for the Western worker to believe that it is possible to live on so little. Facts like these given above seem to go to prove that it is not physiologically impossible. We have here, of course, a fare that a working human being can barely subsist on. 19