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What has become of the Russian Revolution
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 20. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 20. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4717

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 20, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_019.jpg
Transcript Then there was the Torgsin, a store where you paid in foreign money: francs, dollars, pouna sterling, etc., or in precious metals. At the Torgsin you could buy everything. A person who still had a family jewel left could go there and exchange it for a bit of butter or dried legumes. A Russian who had relatives abroad could get them to send dollars and francs to his credit and thus provision himself at the Torgsin till his credit was exhausted. The same thing could be done by travellers passing through Russia. By means of the Torgsin, the Soviet State drew to itself precious metals and foreign exchange. We have just described the food situation as it existed in Russia from 1929 to 1936. This period was marked by a turn of Western public opinion in favor of the USSR, based on the unshaken belief in the existence of a veritable people's paradise in the Soviet Union. What has happened since then has hardly increased the truthfulness of the information supplied by the Soviet publicity experts to the world. What is the situation today? What is the situation now that the two decrees of December 7, 1934, and September 25, 1935, have suppressed the rationed provisioning, unified prices and liquidated the Torgsin stores? Let us first examine the causes of the change. The system of rationed distribution for the 40 million inhabitants of the cities of the Union ended in a sort of maze. It took a long time for the products to reach the consumer. Their concentration in certain places led to enormous losses. The upkeep of a special army of clerks was a great burden on the budget. The infinite complication of the daily provisioning exasperated every section of the population. Instead of palliating the general condition of misery into which the country had slipped, the system of rationed distribution added to it. It was, furthermore, impossible to know the real value of money, as the purchase value of the rouble varied according to the category of the buyer and the nature of the store. That interfered with the calculations of the "planned economy". The simple way out was to return to the "general equivalent" of commodities common in the usual capitalist society. Money regained its importance as the single means of purchase and sale. It again became the common measure of value. The distributors for the "high" categories and the Torgsin became the de luxe stores and restaurants to which everybody now has access. The other distributors were changed into stores patronized by the ordinary Russians. You can buy whatever you wish and where you wish, — if you have the money to buy it with. In order not to lose in the change, the State stabilized prices at a level that favors, to a considerable extent, the high-salaried worthies who are the principal consumers of the costlier goods, and that pulls down even lower the purchasing power of the small wage worker. The reform, therefore, spelled the economic liberation of the privileged layers of Soviet society and deepened the differences existing between the living standards of the various social categories. The single positive result for the worker is that he has been freed from a number of formalities and obsessive worries that were fastened to 13