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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 19
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 19. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 19. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4716

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 19, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_018.jpg
Transcript was rare and irregular. The articles that you had the right to buy were not always on hand in your store. When this system of distribution came to an end, it hardly existed in reality. The consumer accepted any ticket, any purchasing stub, without regard for his own needs. He stationed himself in any line he met, without knowing what he was waiting for. Supposing pants happened to be the weakest part of his wardrobe, but shoes had just arrived. He then did his best to get a purchasing ticket for shoes. After hours of the inevitable wait in line, he might have learned that only small sizes of shoes were left. Now he might have happened to have big feet. But that was nothing. It was pants he was in need of. He therefore let the world about him know that he was ready to trade a fine pair of box-calf shoes no. 35 for a respectable pair of pants. Sunday morning he visited the various "flea markets". And with the aid of patience and favored by chance, he finally got what he wanted. Others exchanged part of their ration of bread for milk, and so on. You can imagine the alarms, worries and fatigue that was the lot of the mother of the poor worker family. To the clerk employed in the distributors the customer of the low social category became an undesirable who never seemed to be satisfied. In spite of this, the crazy "organized" distribution remained the principal method of provisioning the city population of Russia for six years. Besides what he bought at the "cooperative", the worker could buy his noonday meal in his factory lunchroom. But he could do that only on the day when he worked, and only for himself, not for his family. For this meal, too, complete social differentiation was the rule. There were different mess halls, different tables, different hours, different menus, for the different social categories. The quality of the lunchrooms and their menus fell in the following order: "big responsibles", engineers and technicians, oudarniks and simple workers. This is the place to deal with one of the legends about Soviet Russia that are so widespread in the gullible West. It is the story of the differential prices that were supposed to have existed in the distributors and the factory "restaurants". Let us explain. In mess room no. 1 (for "responsibles"), the meal, consisting of soup, leg of mutton, vegetables, dessert and tea, cost from 1.20 to 1.50 roubles. In lunchroom no. 4 (for the common people)—with no choice allowed, at tables for 8 to 12 persons, with self-service—a meal, consisting of soup and "kasha" sold for 0.60 to 0.80 roubles. Evidently the poor paid less. But do not also in the traditional bourgeois society good meals cost more than poor meals? Let us consider now the so-called free distribution of goods. It is effected through the State stores. (Of course, the "cooperatives" and the peasant markets were no less "State".) In these stores, any person can buy freely, choosing the goods he wants, no matter what is his social station. At the time of rationed distribution, prices in the "State" stores were from five to ten times as high as in the "distributors". Therefore, the "State" stores were only accessible to the recipients of the high salaries. On the "peasant" market the worker came to resell at a higher price the monthly kilogram of meat he bought at the cooperative. The "profit" he realized enabled him to get more bread for his family. 17