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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 18
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 18. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4715.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 18. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4715

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 18, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4715.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_017.jpg
Transcript there were three sources of food supply in the cities of Soviet Russia: 1. Rationed provisioning (the most important). 2. "Free" provisioning. 3. Provisioning in exchange for precious metals. The first and the last of these services have been suppressed. There remains today only the so-called free provisioning. Let us describe the situation that existed from 1929 to 1935. The old food cooperative, widespread before the revolution, disappeared—as a cooperative. It became a simple store for the distribution of food-stuffs. It was sometimes called "cooperative" and more often, and just as inexactly, "distributor". These stores, of course, had nothing of the cooperative about them. They were simply wheels in the general administration of the State and formed the base of the system of rationed pro- In the "distributors" each buyer had the right of getting for his money a certain quantity of goods. The quantity allowed differed according to the social category of the buyer. The distributors and "cooperatives" for workers had a small assortment of goods. The goods were of the worst quality imaginable. The purchaser had no right to choose what he bought. The distributors that served the oudarniks and specialists contained goods in bigger quantities and of better quality, and they tolerated a relative choice by the buyer. Finally, there were special stores for the privileged categories. The heads of enterprises, "responsibles", old Bolsheviks (they were not yet suppressed then), foreign technicians and workers, the G.P.U., the higher army ranks had special stores for each group. The articles in these stores were of good quality, and choice was permitted. Naturally there was a special "cooperative" for the Kremlin. Such social specialization of the "distributors" led to the institution of a complicated system of monthly cards (with different colors for each category). These cards bore all sorts of seals and signatures, for which a vast bureaucracy was needed. There existed besides, a system of coupons and tickets, giving one the right to purchase special articles, according to the controlled market possibility (a vest, a cap, 5 kilos of potatoes, three litres of milk, etc.) These cards, coupons and tickets were distributed at the place of work by a special bureau in the factory. If you left your job or were fired, you also lost your right to buy the things you needed to live. In time these documents came to play such an important role in the Soviet scheme of things that they became the most common and important topic of conversation among friends. It was a calamity to lose them. These "papers" —we must understand—merely gave the citizen the "right" to buy with his money a certain product, in a certain quantity, on a certain date, in a certain store. The prices of the "distributors" were the only ones that could be approached by nine-tenths of the population. Missing your ration was equivalent to depriving yourself of the contents of your pocketbook. The store where you were expected to shop was often very far. It was usually located in the vicinity of the factory that had charge of it. If you lived at the other end of the town, you had to visit daily your distributor or you risked losing the meager, yet precious, benefit of distribution that 16