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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 17
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 17. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4714.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 17. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4714

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 17, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4714.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_016.jpg
Transcript The cause of this crisis in lodging is found in the fact that the revolution occupied itself more with "surpassing capitalism" in the construction of giant factories and the organization of men for production than with the well-being of the population. From a distance, it may appear fine to add in several years ten to fifteen million young peasants to the army of builders of technical marvels. Considered from nearby, the spectacle is stupid and sad. The rest will come, we are told. Perhaps it will. But the rest has already come for some. The Homes of the Masters In the center of Moscow rises a fortified city: the Kremlin. Access to it was free in the first days of the revolution. Today, it is rigorously forbidden without special authorization. There are the palaces. In the apartments of the Tsars now live the Stalins, Molotovs, Voroshilovs and their principal lieutenants: the "super-responsibles". They have, besides, summer residences outside of the city. A step lower we find the somewhat less sumptuous private pavilions of the high "specialists", technicians, literateurs, scientists, the "big re- sponsibles". Real apartments, consisting of several rooms and a kitchen—palaces compared to the huts in which the workers live—are the lot of the ordinary specialists and "responsibles" earning more than a 1000 roubles a month. Let us finally note that while the revolution has "suppressed" servants, and there are no longer any "maids", you can get, for very little, one or more "domestic workers". The head of the bureau of "Residential Construction" of the Moscow Soviet informs us in the Izviestia of March 9, 1936 that, in the course of the year, the city will open for occupation 396 new houses. They will contain apartments of 2 to 5 principal rooms. These apartments will not only offer the most modern comfort but will also include a special house-maid's room, measuring about 6 square metres. Each of the masters' rooms will be from 12 to 24 square metres. The Soviet masters are far from doing away with personal servants. They are even far from the desire of according their servants better livin^ conditions. There are other palaces in the USSR: hotels for foreigners. When he is in Moscow, Soviet "socialism" appears, to the touring foreigner, to be framed in gold, marble, comfort and the care of meticulous servitors. The Intourist agency can satisfy the smallest desire of the visiting foreigner on the condition he agrees to sign, before entering Russia, an itinerary and a program from which he may not deviate in the slightest manner. The peasant, as a rule, has kept his little house. But he has not been able to add a new piece to his meager furniture. II Food How It Is Bought From 1929, the year of the "great turn", to the beginning of 1936 15