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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 16
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 16. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4713.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 16. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4713

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 16, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4713.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_015.jpg
Transcript The furniture in the ordinary Soviet worker's home is more than primitive. There are no beds for all members of the family. Beds are frequently made of winter clothing stretched on the floor. There are hardly any chairs. Large trunks hold dishes and clothing. Closets are rare. Because the rooms are so crowded, because linen, dishes and other personal effects are piled under the beds and in corners, it is no wonder that lice, bed bugs, cockroaches and rats abound. The concentration of tenants in a house is too great to permit the proper care of such common places as kitchens and water closets. The following extracts from the Soviet papers give some indication of the rents, surface occupied by the average family, and the hygienic condition of the rooms and apartments: In Za Indoustrializatsiou, September 18, 1934: "Near the giant metallurgical plant of Great Kramatorsk (Donbass), an angle (a corner—Ed.) in an ordinary house costs about 100 to 150 roubles a month: an angle in a zemlianka (a dug-out—Ed.) costs from 25 to 30 roubles a month. "About 3000 workers live at least 6 kilometres (about 4 miles) from the plant, 4600 workers at a distance of 6 to 30 kilometres from the plant, and several thousands have their lodgings even farther away; it takes them 3 to 4 hours' travel to get to work." Troud, the organ of the trade unions, June 12, 1934, reports: "At the Istomkinski plant, the worker Poliakov (typical worker) lives in a room 10 square metres (barracks no. 1) with his family of six persons. In November 1932, he paid a monthly rent of 32.37 roubles. In November 1933, he had to pay 54.25 roubles. Another worker (barracks no. 8) had a room 22.3 square metres (about 240 square feet) for his family of seven. In November 1932 he paid 37.80 roubles. A year later he was asked 139.37 roubles. In each of the given cases, two members of the family had become wage earners." In Ordjonikidze's speech, made at a meeting of directors and technicians of heavy industry, published in Za I ndoustrializatsiou, September 1934, we find: "For the entire month during which I visited in Ural, the complaint in every house was 'Bedbugs, bedbugs!' " The same paper reports in its issues of May 14 and July 21, 1934, about the Gorki automobile factories: "22.3% of the workers, that is, 5000, live in huts where water freezes in Winter, and bedbugs rule in Summer. Since there are no sewers, the air is especially foul. "There are also 228 'zemliankas.' " This was found to be true some years after the Gorki giant, a marvel of technique, had been set in motion. Indeed, before the revolution the Russian worker had worse lodging than his Western brother. That in itself makes the situation that is described by the Soviet papers less unbelievable than it seems. But it is nonetheless true that the situation of the Russian worker in this sphere has in no way grown better (excepting for a small section: the super-oudarniks and stakhanovists). 14