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What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 13
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 13. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 13. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4710

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 13, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_012.jpg
Transcript Part One HOW THE SOVIET WORKER LIVES Lodging Different Kinds of Homes Since the revolution dispossessed the proprietors, the tenants formed cooperatives, with house committees to take charge of the upkeep of the houses and the apportionment of the rooms. The house committee still exists, but only in name. It has changed its character completely. It has become an executive wheel of the local centralized organism of the State. It now has at its head a communist "responsible", who is the absolute master of the distribution and the regulation of the house. There are several other systems of house control. There is, for example, the so-called "common house". Like "house committee" and "house cooperative" the name is suggestive of the revolutionary period. The following is the origin of the common house. At the time of the revolution, the workers seized, together with the factories, all the buildings dependent on them; the owners' houses, the houses of the managers, as well as the houses in the adjoining "worker town." All these buildings became the "common houses" of the workers in the factory. At present, the common houses are not under the direct and exclusive control of the workers. They are controlled and regulated by the factory management, which has a special "housing" bureau to take charge of them. When the worker leaves the factory, he loses at the same time his domicile. In the category of "common house" belong most of the newly built houses. These are constructed on the model of the "worker town" and are reserved to the privileged employees of the industrial enterprises: the "responsibles", specialists, oudarniks and stakhanovists. Another kind of habitation, which is quite general today, is the large, wooden barracks, similar to the war-time Adrian huts. They are composed of single rooms, each holding 25 to 40 beds for unmarried workers, but sometimes also for whole families. To begin with, only workers employed in construction and in public works were lodged in these barracks. But with industrialization, the formidable development of new factories multiplied the number of such domiciles. Now they are the principal mode of housing in some cities. In the Ural and in Siberia, these barracks form towns of 100,000 and more. They are the principal feature of the landscape around the "industrial giants" and the other grandiose achievements extolled by the Soviet agencies. In the environs of the large cities, there are found also small individual houses, usually referred to as "dacha". They are costly, 11