Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
What has become of the Russian Revolution
Image 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 10. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4707.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4707

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 10, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4707.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_009.jpg
Transcript they cast their spell over the confused and scared masses of Soviet Russia, is repeated even by some people who recognize the exploitation practiced by the Soviet masters on the laboring population of Russia. But they who find in the apparent absence of competition within Russia a sign of the abolition of capitalism forget that what makes capitalist economy capitalist is precisely its mode of production. Russia we are told is economically like Ford's general enterprise. The various component plants deal with one another, — not on the commercial exchange basis, but as different departments of one concern. However, the internal social organization they recognize as non-capitalist is that which is found within every capitalist factory, within every trust. The U.S.S.R. is a badly, loosely run trust of trusts, competing on the world market against all other capitalists and carrying on a relation of exchange—under the monopolist conditions dictated by the masters of Soviet production—with the peasant millions of Russia. The Soviet State representing the privileged interests of the non-productive social strata of Russia (the officials, managers, army, police, writers, actors, publicists, Party functionaries, etc.), is the single national capitalist. ("Capitalist" is an economic unit.) "The category 'capitalist' has itself become a social category. It has become 'socialized'—within the framework of capitalist society." The Soviet State runs the national enterprise in the interests of all the parasites—the non-producers —who, in Russia and abroad, live, in small part or largely, on the surplus value (officials' salaries, "wages of superintendence," royalties, etc., etc.) produced by the wage-slaves laboring in the all-inclusive national enterprise. The national capitalist carries on a class struggle: 1. Against its own wage slaves. As in Nazi Germany, the State employer forbids the worker to change a job without permission. It dictates wage tariffs to the workers. It contravenes any attempt at opposition on the part of the workers by forcing them into its State ^'company" unions and by holding over their heads the threat of the armed forces and its "company" police. It drives and sweats the workers by means of the system of piece work and bonus premiums. 2. Against the precapitalist producers of Russia: the peasants and artisans. The State capitalist expropriates.the latter through arbitrary monopolistic exchange of goods, in which it—the sole manufacturer, with the machinery of State at its disposal—sets prices, "selling dear and buying cheap", It expropriates them through heavy taxation, as was and is done by the capitalist State everywhere else, but not in such a high-handed, brutal manner. When the peasants attempt to combat the monopolist capitalist by calling a "farmers' holiday", the State capitalist "collectivizes" them. That is, it puts them into a situation where the peasants must depend entirely on the State capitalist for their seed, implements and soil to be tilled.