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What has become of the Russian Revolution
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 8. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4705.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 8. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4705

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 8, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4705.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_007.jpg
Transcript the midst of the pre-war 'jockeying of the "go'od and bad" imperialist powers of the world, — the "menace of fascism." The first of the present series of Moscow trials and executions startled even the most rapt of the intellectual true-believers. There were apparently far-reaching social contradictions laboring under the satin surface of Intotirist Russia. In his plain-spoken Letter to Moscow (see November 1936 issue of the International Review), Ignazio Silone diagnoses the mental malady afflicting our Intourist Sovietists as "juridical cretinism." "Juridical cretinism," writes Silone, "consists especially of the habit of considering the laws of a country as the exact representation of the social relations obtaining among the citizens of that country. It is this juridical cretinism that explains, for example, the mental debility of those intellectuals who go to Italy, study the country's Fascist laws and come home convinced that there is no longer any capitalism in Italy, since it was supposedly abolished there by the Fascist laws. And should such a traveller happen to go to France, he would return as deeply convinced that the ideals of "Liberty, Equality and Fraternity" form the basis of the social relations obtaining in France, since those are the solemn words he would see on all government stationery, on all courthouses, on all school buildings, and over all public comfort stations. "Socialist criticism, from the time of its foundation by Marx and Engels, has warned us against this disease of juridical cretinism. Socialists have always criticized formal democracy, abstract freedom, equality on paper. Socialists have always said that one cannot judge a country by its laws but only by the real social relationships existing among human beings. Emil Ludwig, Lion Feuchtwanger and Jacob Buehrer go into raptures over the new Soviet Constitution. (Too much must not be expected from literary folk.) But no socialist worker, inoculated with Marxist understanding, and thus made immune to juridical cretinism, will place any faith in the abstract paragraphs of the Soviet Constitution. In view of the August slaughter, he will ask: 'What has become of the Russian Revolution? What are the objective reasons for this aggravation of the inner contradictions in the Soviet Union?'" And these precisely are the questions that Yvon answers in his surprising booklet. It is not the product of a professional writer. Yvon is a worker. He went back to the bench upon his return to France, after spending eleven years in the U.S.S.R., where as a simple laborer, then as a manager, and as a member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, he contributed his bit to the functioning of the Soviet social pyramid. Especially because his chief criterion is invariably the consideration of the workers' material interests, Yvon is able to cut clean through the ideologies that have enmeshed so many academicians who have attempted to deal with the Soviet "experiment". Yvon pierces through the appearances of things because he always thinks as a class-conscious worker.