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What has become of the Russian Revolution
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Yvon, M., 1899-1986. What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 7. 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4704.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986. (1937). What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 7. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4704

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Yvon, M., 1899-1986, What has become of the Russian Revolution - Image 7, 1937, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4766/show/4704.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title What has become of the Russian Revolution
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Yvon, M., 1899-1986
Contributor (Local)
  • Integer
Publisher International Review
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1937
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Communism
  • Economics
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • Social conditions
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Soviet Union
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 63 pages; 22 cm
Original Item Location HN523.Y8613 1937
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304536~S11
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2209396_006.jpg
Transcript INTRODUCTION It is especially important to understand the social character of the U.S.S.R. because of its socialist claims. The great interest of non-Russians in the Soviet State sprang from the social connotations of the Russian Revolution. This interest increased—and at the same time changed its class complexion—with the stabilization of the Bolshevik regime. It took on an element of doubt in face of the present, apparently constant, succession of Moscow executions. Immediately after October 1918, the Western labor parties that were affiliated with the Communist International "talked revolution." Whether this purpose was fulfilled consciously or unwittingly, the call for revolution in the West served as a means to defend the Russian Bolshevik government against foreign intervention. The neo-communist belief in the immediacy of a world revolution, to be modelled everywhere on the Petrograd coup of 1918, was countered by a wave of anti-Soviet villification and exaggeration which swept along illustrious writers and very serious organs of public intelligence. With the introduction of the first Five Year Plan—and the first pangs of the great depression—the pro-Soviet viewpoint began to find a new instrument of expression. Authors that could not be called communist began to present in writing the panorama of a "Soviet paradise" in which the dreams of the traditional social reformer seemed already realized or about to reach incarnation. Little known literary folk attained prominence with volumes presenting seductive pictures of a more or less perfectly working society in Russia. Books dealing with the wonders of the U.S.S.R. were devoured by the depression-hit intellectuals of the West. There came into being a distinct category of "pro-Soviet" authors. These specialists drank deep of the inspiring stuff provided them by the publicity bureaux of the Russian government and wrote accounts of a Soviet society that were filled with greater and greater enthusiasm and were more and more at variance with the truth of the situation. These writers mistook appearances for reality and "paper" claims for facts. No more than the "pure communist" party writers of the early twenties did they try. or want to, .unravel the problem of the historic significance of Russian Bolshevism. Just as the first had mistaken the Russians' attempt to deal with the breakdown of the national economic process for the introduction of communism, so did the new Western Sovietists mistake the Soviet program of the industrialization and modernization of that backward country for the construction of socialism. Much of the rhapsodic pro-Sovietism of the Western intellectuals was the result of the efforts of the incomparable publicity experts in the employ of the Russian State. But much of it was the work of the malicious demons of the depression. The scared Western intellectuals sought and found a Holy Land in the mysterious East. The old "revolutionary" communism seemed to be replaced with a different (no more critical) outlook—that of Intourism. And the latter was reinforced with a new social emotion, springing from