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Anti-Soviet sabotage exposed
Image 23
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Krzhizhanovskiĭ, Gleb Maksimilianovich, 1872-1959. Anti-Soviet sabotage exposed - Image 23. 1932. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4697/show/4675.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Krzhizhanovskiĭ, Gleb Maksimilianovich, 1872-1959. (1932). Anti-Soviet sabotage exposed - Image 23. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4697/show/4675

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Krzhizhanovskiĭ, Gleb Maksimilianovich, 1872-1959, Anti-Soviet sabotage exposed - Image 23, 1932, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4697/show/4675.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Anti-Soviet sabotage exposed
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Krzhizhanovskiĭ, Gleb Maksimilianovich, 1872-1959
Publisher Workers Library Publishers
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1932
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Sabotage
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Russia
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 39 pages; 21 cm
Original Item Location HV6295.S65K79
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304406~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_29628835_022.jpg
Transcript railways. Private railways were best supplied with rolling stock : The Kazan railway received an allotment of freight locomotives of the series ' E ' instead of the unserviceable ' F ' which were sent to the Tashkent and Transcaucasian railways. The Kiev-Voronezh and the South-Eastern railways received an allotment of new locomotives, and their locomotives of the series ' B ' were sent to the Tashkent,, Central-Asiatic and Transcaucasian railways. The Kazan railway received several hundred new passenger cars; the. North Caucasian railway, with the adjoining small private lines, received enormous sums for the restoration of rolling stock ; the Ryazan Ural railway was also not forgotten, it received many serviceable cars and new engines. The former Windau railway, which is now divided between the Moscow- White-Russian-Baltic and the North Western railways, was completely neglected; for, on the one hand, no one in our organisation had interests in it, and, on the other, it was one of the lines near the frontier, and our organisation was hampering the improvement of all such. . . " Private railways were improved by means of a more frequent change of rails (the Kazan, the Ryazan-Ural, the Kiev-Voronezh railways), by increasing their capacity (North Caucasian, Kazan, and other railways), by developing the junctions (Rostov, Sortirovochaya, Kazan Railway), etc. It should be pointed out that many of the measures indicated above, while serving the interests of private railways, were at the same time, under the existing soviet conditions, a sabotage, both by their extent and prematurity, and by the loss inflicted indirectly on the other railways of our Union. For instance, the Tashkent, Central-Asiatic, and Kursk railways were utterly neglected; the Omsk Railway was not sufficiently improved ; the Transcaucasian Railway, used for exports, was weakened, etc. The plan of our council embraced two more- measures, which were already partly worked out, but not carried out owing to the beginning of the breakdown of our organisation, i.e., the arrests. These two measures consisted in reorganising the network of railways, and the forms of railway administration. In the first place the reorganisation was designed to increase the value of private railways by adding to them profitable sections of state railways; and, secondly, the new forms of management were to give the private owners, after they received back the railways, the 21