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Party ownership of the press
Image 33
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Party ownership of the press - Image 33. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 33. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4502

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 33, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_032.jpg
Transcript more pronouncedly impure than even themselves, flocked to their standard: Anarchists of both the rose and the dirty water persuasion; anti-Socialist labor lieutenants, corporals and sergeants of the capitalist class; Christian Socialist preachers without pulpits; lawyers without briefs; fishy professionals; promoters of get-rich-quick and other three-card- monte speculators upon the unsuspecting working class; hungry politicians; thirsty editors and literati; etc., etc.; all rushed together, a veritable mob of barbarians, upon the S. L. P., the citadel of the Party, the Daily People being instinctively the objective of all. The experience of the S. L. P. resembles, as time will more and more clearly bear out, the experience made by Rome at the time of the first inroad of the barbarians upon the civilization of the Roman republic, at the time struggling for a footing. The barbarian Gauls dashed against the Roman territory carrying devastation before them. The weaklings fled to distant safety; the virile, driven back, gathered for a last stand on the Capitoline Hill. Against that citadel the hordes of the Gauls dashed their heads in vain. There were traitors among those who had gathered on the Hill, and they deserted; but their conduct left the true undaunted. These—in . the language with which two thousand two hundred and ninety-five years later the Philadelphia Socialist party paper, the Tageblatt, rendered unintentional homage to the S.L.P., "counted neither their own fewness, nor the multitude of their foes." The intrepid band on the Capitoline Hill knew they were the Ark of Civilization. They stood their ground. The barbarian force spent itself; the logic of its illogical pretenses dissolved their ranks. The threatening flood receded. Astounded Latium recovered its breath and flocked to the support of the conquering band that now descended from the Capitoline. The barbarians fled, never more to appear before the walls of Rome except as Roman captives—and Rome re-rose—and fulfilled her historic mission. A Capitoline Hill to the Socialist Republic of the land—that has been the Daily People so far—and will prove itself to the end, through the whole gamut of events. The barbarian hordes that assailed the Daily People were resisted; their stratagems to throw dismay into the hearts of the men at bav. now with false halloos of "Victory!", then through the corruption of unprincipled individuals among them, proved vain. Never counting its numbers, and never recking the multitude of its adversaries; conscious of its historic mission; the logic of its own historically sound posture, the logic of the historically unsound posture of its adversaries, both steadily working in its favor, the intrepid S. L. P. throughout the land stood its ground on its Capitoline Hill. Well may the S. L. P. today, on this tenth anniversary of the Daily People, and with the foe visibly melting away preparatorily to the stampede in store for them, proudly recite the words of the Latin poet— 31