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Party ownership of the press
Image 30
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Party ownership of the press - Image 30. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4499.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 30. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4499

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 30, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4499.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_029.jpg
Transcript their smallness and large numbers, they were private at all points. Having been private concerns then, their modern mammoth, monopolistic supplanters continue to be looked upon as private. Due to this vis in- ertiae of the mind, the pregnant fact that mammoth concerns of today are seen the sole purveyors of food, transportation, light, heat, clothing, etc., frequently even of enjoyments, generally escapes due appreciation. Old habits of thought, acquired under immature economic conditions, blind the mind to an appreciation of the pregnant fact that modern industries now work for the public, that they employ the public, that the public depends upon them; in short, that the character of industry stands transformed. Once a private affair, it has developed into a public ministry. That an industry which supplies the community with ice is a public ministry may escape the superficial observer. But it cannot escape even the sluggish eye of the most superficial that the industry which supplies the community with information is radically different from a private affair. The newspaper industry, accordingly, brings out in clearest light the point of development reached. As with the industries that supply the community with the material needs of life, those that supply it with food for the mind have reached that point where virtual monopoly exists. The capital needed to operate them is not within reach of the masses. Their functions have become public and, therefore, sacred; yet the means to operate them remained private and, therefore, left them subject to pri vate whim, caprice and interests. To overthrow the social system in which so perverse and brutifying a contradiction is possible, and to establish that social system in which the public ministry of production, transportation and distribution shall be placed in the hands of the public, the Socialist Labor Party raised its standard in 1890, and has kept it ever since in the front ranks, beating its way forward, undeterred by difficulties or opposition. That same undaunted spirit now sets up its daily paper to hasten on the day when the work, initiated by the Revolutionary Fathers, shall be completed, and economic dependence being abolished, freedom may reign in the land. The capitalist press, obedient to the principle of its ownership, performs its ministry upon lines identical with all other capitalist enterprises—for private gains; "it is there to sell." The Daily People has a message to deliver to the working class of America, upon whose back a brigand class is riding it to cooliedom. The Daily People will deliver its message undeterred by open foes, undiscouraged by hidden ones, and unaffected by any wiles of cajolery. It will deliver its message, never compromising with truth to make a friend, nor ever withholding a blow at error lest it make an enemy. Conscious of the arduous task before it, and also conscious of the certain ascendency of its cause, the Daily People unsheathes its sword, gives the scabbard to the enemy, and enters the lists. 28