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Party ownership of the press
Image 26
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Party ownership of the press - Image 26. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4495.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 26. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4495

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 26, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4495.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 26
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_025.jpg
Transcript York, limited itself to "agitation"— after a style; but they knew not their ground, evoked no response, and, owing to the frequently repulsive mannerisms of their principal spokesmen, were often even laughed at and despised; they grew disheartened; the less intellectually honest, vainer and less informed, like Alexander Jonas, Julius Grun- zig, Hermann Schlueter and others, imputed their failure, not, as in fact, to their own shortcomings, but, to use their own words, to the "hopeless stupidity and corruption of the American people"; and thus, by degrees, the "Party" shrank into social clubs—singing and drinking and card-playing societies, with an occasional outing when a member died, and periodical celebrations in which thrilling speeches were delivered by themselves to themselves. While this development was going on, there were others setting in also. Years ago the earnings of labor were higher; a thrifty mechanic, who did not object to pinching himself some, could lay by money in the bank. With the development of the capitalist system, earnings declined, savings became harder to make and jobs rarer to get. Driven out of the shop by improved machinery and concentrating capital, the workingmen with savings in the bank fell back upon that, and started small stores, in short, rebounded into the middle class. One of the results of that—the seeming increase of the middle class— stumped the unscientific mind. The German Socialist, Edward Bernstein, concluded Marx was wrong, and the vulgar economists everywhere started new songs on the beauties of capitalism. Another re sult—the one we are here concerned with—was the changing of the angle of vision of the former workingman, who had become bourgeois. Speaking only a few years ago of the intellectual decline of the German Social Democracy, August Bebel referred to the numerous workingmen in Germany, who, being victimized by reason of their political activity, had to be provided with small stores by the German party, and, with their change of class interests, slid off from their pristine clear-cut radicalism. The economic development of capitalism here, above referred to, that caused workingmen with deposits to become small traders, wrought a like change in them. The change told strongly among certain German workingmen. Ther= is a third development that needs mention. It is akin to the one last considered. The worker, who had some savings, being thrown on the street by machinery, could fall back upon his savings and become bourgeois; the worker, who had none, stood on the ragged edge of the abyss of labor fakerism. Into that abyss fell not a few. Their unions became reactionary "pure and simple"; all sense of solidarity vanished; there was no longer a question of organizing and protecting the working class; the union became a means for those in it to get a job by and to put others out of their jobs; and finally it ripened into an engine of capitalism, sold to the politicians by the leading fakers. Now, then, all these interests — the German labor faker, the German bourgeois ex-workingman and the singing, etc., society tired-out Socialist — clustered in this city around and centered in a German 24