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Party ownership of the press
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Party ownership of the press - Image 21. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 21. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4490

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 21, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_020.jpg
Transcript FAITH, a disloyal Party editor, he, of course, DOES NOT feel himself under, has no sense of, any such obligation. SECOND DEFENSE — "The matter was frequently treated by the Vorwaerts in such a style that I could not use the article."-—Quite possible; every one has his own style of presenting a thing; one man's style is often distasteful to another; that sentiment must be respected. But a Party editor, with faith in the Party's future, a loyal editor, feels in such a case BOUND to use such facts, presented in a style that he disapproves of, and take the trouble himself to write an article upon them in the style that suits him. An editor, on the contrary, who has no such faith, a DISLOYAL Party editor, HE feels himself under no such obligation; TO HIM, that would be "too much bother"; HE takes it easy. THIRD DEFENSE—"I could not vouch for the facts mentioned in The People."—Again, this is a consideration that deserves respect; the editor of a paper must feel sure of the facts he publishes; false facts would rather injure. But a Party editor, with faith in the Party's future, a LOYAL, conscientious editor, feels BOUND to verify such facts. An editor, on the contrary, with no such faith, a DISLOYAL Party editor, runs away from work; HE does not fill the office for the Party's sake; HE ducks his head, lets the facts slide—and draws his salary. But all this is only the "little end" of the horn, symptomatic enough of such element, but yet only the "little end" of the horn in the development. From not "feeling bound" to take in everything, from "not feeling bound" to exert themselves in behalf of the Party, the element that has no faith in the Party develops disloyaltyward. The next step is a readiness to give the enemy "the benefit of the doubt." You all know the defense of the Carey-Debs Democracy in the matter of their Armory record, to wit, that if Carey had not voted for the $15,000 armory appropriation a heavy fine would have followed. How did Schlueter treat the matter? He gave the defense in full and then, editorially, added that he was not qualified to judge upon its correctness — and his supporters support him in this! Think of it, a Party editor, within six hours' ride of Haverhill, "unqualified" to pass judgment upon so stupidly infamous and infamously stupid a defense! The element that HAS faith in the Party feels its pulse beat with indignation at such a "defense," and no effort is too much for it to make in order to confute the rascal Ar- moryites. The element, on the contrary, that HAS NO FAITH in the Party, the element and editor that are on the lookout for a "new party" to rise, they, of course, find it in keeping with their sentiments to "be gentle" with such miscreants, possibly the expected "new party" —and thus the irritation is increased while the lines are being drawn sharper between them. The element that has no faith in the Party presently begins to tamper with the Party's principles and policy, while still pretending fealty to it. This is happening on the subject of the Party's trade union policy. From Schlueter down, you have seen them take up and hug to 19