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Party ownership of the press
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Party ownership of the press - Image 14. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4483.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 14. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4483

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 14, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4483.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_013.jpg
Transcript Socialistic Cooperative Publishing Association), and, after a protracted debate, the Association, by a vote of 62 against 28, rejected at its meeting of the 23rd of last month, the action of the board of directors, both with regard to the censure and their authorizing of its publication in The People. When it is considered that the constitution of the Association expressly prescribes that its publication shall be edited IN ACCORD WITH THE PRINCIPLES AND TACTICS OF THE S. L. P., the decision that the Association arrived at on the 23 rd, thus flying in the face of its own constitution, would be in itself suggestive enough; contrasted with the conduct of the Association in the instance of four years ago, aforementioned, when, by its silence, approval was implied, its present attitude becomes still more interesting to watch. The details of the last occurrence throw such a light upon the matter that they raise it to one of still greater interest, revealing a situation that is full of suggestions upon some of the rocks that the Party will have to steer clear of for the safety of its oncoming English daily. During the debate, with hardly an exception, those who supported the editor of the Volkszeitung cheered the conduct that he was censured for on the ground that it was proper to attack the Party policy. Again and again the statement was made by his supporters that "we must emancipate ourselves from the Party"; again and again they declared that "it is time to resist the Party policy"; again and again was the Party's policy, not on the trade union question only, but on a score of other questions, roundly denounced and the conduct of the Volkszeitung in the matter at hand hailed as the turning over of a new leaf. Tolerance for Anarchists was demanded (Herstein) ; the Party was ridiculed (Heinrich); its membership and thereby itself was belittled, and the General Committee of Section Greater New York was pronounced hopeless and even corrupted (H. Stahl) ; a rupture between the Party and the Volkszeitung was declared to threaten no harm to the paper (A. Jonas) ; the Party's attitude toward DeBsism was called "mud-slinging" (Koeln); and, as a matter of course, The People came in for a full share of abuse, although most of its assailants do not and cannot read it, and none knows enough English to judge. And these statements received, one after another, generous applause. Here was a palpable annulling of the Association's constitution, and of a rebellion against the Party. But palpable as the fact was, an incident removed all doubt that might linger on the subject. Here and there, during the debate, the less heated felt constrained to cover up the cloven hoof of their attitude; they sought to cloak it with the claim that the Volkszeitung articles in question "were not attacks upon the Party policy, and, consequently, were not a violation of the Association's constitution, but were merely the exercise of the just right of criticism." The veil was transparently thin, and was, in many an unguarded moment, torn through by the very ones who sought its protection. Nevertheless, seeing the argument was made, its sincerity was brought to a 12