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Party ownership of the press
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Party ownership of the press - Image 10. 1931. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1931). Party ownership of the press - Image 10. Socialist and Communist Pamphlets. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4479

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Party ownership of the press - Image 10, 1931, Socialist and Communist Pamphlets, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp/item/4506/show/4479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Party ownership of the press
Alternative Title Party ownership of the press: historic documents relating to the establishing of the principles involved
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • De Leon, Daniel, 1852-1914
Publisher New York Labor News Company
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • New York, New York
Date 1931
Description Articles by De Leon reprinted from The People (later the Weekly people)--and the Daily people, voicing the interests of the working class and the Socialist Labor Party.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Political parties
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Socialist Labor Party
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • United States
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Extent 32 pages: portrait; 24 cm
Original Item Location JK2391.S7N4 1931
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b8304494~S5
Original Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection Socialist and Communist Pamphlets
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/scpamp
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections
Use and Reproduction In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_11131832_009.jpg
Transcript the publication of the PEOPLE out of the hands of the association and publish the paper itself. Today it may seem curious that any opposition should arise to this. But it did, and a fierce opposition too. It was argued that so large and unwieldy a group as the whole Party could never publish a paper, that it would be the death of the paper, etc. The membership at large, however, though far from the homogeneous body it is today—thanks mostly to the homogeneous press—had faith and the PEOPLE became really the property and the publication of the Party. So far from dying, it instantly took new strength, as witness the Daily People which the Party sustained for fourteen years. For fourteen more years De Leon spoke through our organ, now truly a (Party organ, the Daily People, the Weekly People, and for a time also ibhe Monthly People. During these years the policy, the tactics of the Party and with it the necessary and inevitable tactics of the Socialist revolution in America, and in a broader sense in the world, was beaten into shape and disseminated. The members of the Socialist Labor Party, the readers of the PEOPLE in general, absorbed S.L.P.ism; the ideas and conception became clarified; the propaganda firm and uniform; the tactics of the movement sound and direct. The S. L. P. developed a language of its own, clear and unmistakable. An S. L. P. man came to be recognized by friend as well as foe the instant he opened his mouth. The slightest wabbliness within the ranks was instantly recognized. Our foes sneered—"hero worship," "every S. L. P. man is simply echoing De Leon," "no S.L. P. man dares have an idea of his own." We could afford to smile. We knew that S. L. P. members were all persons of ideas, persons of thought, and it was a joy to see that •these thoughts never scattered, never flew off at a tangent. "Truth is one, it unites; error is manifold, it scatters." We perceived error scattering our foes. The S. P. had as many different notions of Socialism as it once had editors (and there were hundreds) and speakers, not to say members. The I. W. W. split on the rock of immature and anarchistic ideas. The Communist party is like a tapeworm, it has been pulled into innumerable parts, Communist party, Proletarian party, Workers' party, united Communists, reunited Communists, majority and minority and middle of the road groups, each chattering in a different dialect, like so many loose-jointed tribes of Sioux Indians. The S. L. P. man, wherever he is found, not only knows what he is talking about, he knows how to say it—thanks to our press and the education it has been able to disseminate. As the life energy of the press has flowed out over the Party, so the very life blood of Party members has flowed into the press. The PEOPLE, since 1891, has truly been the Party's child, nourished by the membership at heavy costs that were never looked upon as a sacrifice, jealously guarded from the slightest connection that could establish even the minutest hostile influence—to the extent of finally cutting off even that universally recognized support of the press, the advertiser. The S. L. P. members know that if the workers shall con- 8